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Published by ArchersArchery on 14 Jan 2011

Lone Wolf Tree Stands

This is my first offical blog, so please bare with me!

We own a small Archery Pro-Shop in Midland, Mi. We just returned from the 2011 Archery Trade Show in Indiana. And the one thing that really stood out to us, was the fact that Lone Wolf  Tree Stands manufacturing has returned to the States!!!!!

We are  extremly excited to sell these Treestand as Made in the USA again!

Congradulations Lone Wolf!

-Archer’s Archery

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Published by archerchick on 13 Jan 2011

Harnessing The Wind ~By Steve Bartylla

Bowhunting World October 2005


BOWHUNTING WORLD
October 2005

HARNESSING THE WIND – By Steve Bartylla

How To Channel The Wind To Gain An Advantage Over A Buck’s Sensitive Nose

Catching movement out of the corner of my eye, I saw the mature 10-point trotting down his rub line. In a matter of seconds, the event would either end in success or failure. Already positioned, I was ready when the buck stepped into the clear. Settling the pin high behind the front shoulder, I sent the arrow driving into the buck’s vitals. As he crashed away, I could see that the expandable was lodged squarely in the buck’s vitals. I knew he wouldn’t go far.

The gross-scoring 146 4/8 inch 10-point I took early in Wisconsin’s 2004 Archery season was the first of three Pope & Young bucks I was lucky enough to bag last season. Though the specific events of each one varied, they all shared one theme. I placed each of the strands to take advantage of the wind.

Before you leap to conclusions, I should point out that I don’t worry about bucks coming in downwind of my stand. Instead, I employ a thorough and highly effective odor-reduction strategy. Doing so allows me the freedom to focus on harnessing a tremendous advantage; it provides the ability to set stands based on how bucks can most effectively use the wind.

Using the wind to survive
To take advantage of the wind we must first understand how bucks use it to their own advantage. There’s no better place to begin than by examining how it applies to bedding. To do so, let’s dig a little deeper into how the buck that began this piece harnessed it’s potential.

Bedding on an east-west ridge, he had both alfalfa and corn in the valleys to either side. With clearly marked rub lines, following the paths to his two most common bedding sites was easy. As it turned out, they were both knobs located just below the top of the ridge. One was the south side and the other on the north.

The positioning of these knobs provided the buck the ability to see danger approaching from below and use the wind to cover his backside. With any form of a northerly wind, the bucks would bed on the south side of the ridge, only to choose the knob on the north for southerly winds.

Digging deeper still, because of the identical crops being offered in each valley, he would let the wind dictate which one he spend the evening feeding in. With a north wind, he would rise from his south side bed and cross over the ridge to drop down to the northern valley. Doing so allowed him to keep the wind in his face and scent check the field for danger. As with his bedding choice doing the opposite with a southerly wind offered him the same advantage. Both his sign and several nights of observation proved this to be the case.

With this knowledge in hand, it was a simple matter of hanging stands along his rub line, just over the opposite sides of the ridge from his beds. Arriving for the afternoon hunt, a quick check of the wind direction dictated on which stand to sit.

In reality, that was not a common scenario. Most times bucks aren’t afforded the
luxury of identical food sources on both sides. When all things are equal, a buck
will most often choose going into the wind, while traveling from his bed to feed. However, things aren’t always equal. When he desires one food source over others, he will often travel with the wind at his side or back to get there. Buck travels can’t always be completely dictated by the wind.
Still, as was the case with the Wisconsin buck, there are situations where it can easily occur.

When that’s the case, it can remove a lot of doubt as to which trail and food source the big boy will be using on a given day. Unlike deer travels to and from food, the wind almost always plays a role in how a buck beds. At the very least, as illustrated earlier, deer have the very strong tendency to bed with the wind at their back and use their eyes to protect their front side. Doing so simply makes sense from a survival standpoint.

In areas with relief, we can use this knowledge to our advantage. In broken or rolling land, when an individual buck is rotating between several bedding sites, many times the wind direction dictates which he will select. The safety advantage of beds that simultaneously offer a
good view of the front and wind coverage of the back is tremendous. In this setting, analyzing which bedding site is best for the current wind condition can transform a stab in the dark to
a highly educated guess. Though it wont always be right, you may find that you are now right more often than before. That can take a lot of the blind luck out of deciding where to sit on a particular day.


Wind And The Rut
As helpful as playing the wind during the non-rutting phases of the season can be,
its even more so during the scraping, chase and breeding phases. Now is when
hunters can gain an incredible advantage.

ODOR CONTROL
Despite popular belief, you really can beat a whitetail’s nose. However, if anyone believes
that simply buying a carbon suit is the answer they will most likely be disappointed.
Carbon suits are a big help, but they’re only one ingredient in a recipe for success.
When a deer whiffs danger, it doesn’t matter if they smell a hunter’s body, breath,
grunt tube, mechanical release, bow, optics or anything else brought into the woods.
The end result; They head the other way fast. To truly beat a whitetail’s nose, you must
address every item you bring in the woods. To do this, l rely on several tools:

Clean paper towels wet with hydrogen peroxide work well to scent—clean hard surface
such as bows, arrows, optics, glasses, rattling antlers, grunt tubes and so on.

Scent—killing sprays are effective on anything made of cloth or strings,
as well as rubber boots.

A mixture of scent—killing soap and water works well for washing the inside
of rubber boots as well as many other larger items.

Scent—killing bar soaps, shampoo, deodorant and detergents are used on
my body and clothes.

Baking soda works as a toothpaste and also, by adding about a quarter-cup ,
to the inside of boots during storage, as an odor—eater.

These tools, combined with a carbon suit provide the necessary ingredients for me
to go undetected. Next, there are some tips that can help avoid trip—ups:
Begin exclusively using scent—killing soaps and stop using aftershaves and
scented deodorants a month before season. This allows your pores to rid
themselves of these odors.

Avoid eating high-odor and gassy foods and liquids. Though commonly
overlooked, coffee produces a breath that brushing won’t solve.

Treat washcloths and towels in the same way as hunting clothing. Drying off
with a towel washed in scented detergent, dried with a fabric softener or
stored in the bathroom can make showering a wasted effort.

Whenever practical, have duplicates. For example, rather than use the same
smelly release aid that you practice with, have an identical release that’s
used solely for hunting.

Leave unnecessary items in the truck. A knife, dragging ropes, gutting
gloves and a host of others things can be retrieved on an as—needed basis.
Clean the inside of the truck, get rid of air fresheners and keep the windows
down. Even though you won’t be wearing the same clothing, truck smells can
pollute your hair and body.

Wear treated clothing while driving and change at the parking spot.
Think of and treat every item brought into the woods.

It’s no secret that many of the best-producing scrapes are those located on the
downwind side of bedding areas. With a single pass, a buck can check both his scrape
and the bedding area for a doe entering estrus early. In that scenario, it isn’t a coincidence
that the hottest scrapes on a given day are often dictated by the wind direction.

To fine—tune stand placement for hunting these scrapes, I strive to set up 20
yards downwind of the scrape. Any buck that wants to check the scrape must
either come to or be downwind of it. lt isn’t uncommon for bucks to check these
scrapes from 10 to 40 yards downwind. This stand placement allows me to catch
all of that activity. More than once it has provided me with shot opportunities at
bucks checking scrapes from a distance.

Again, the wind can be a tremendous ally to bucks checking for hot does. Though bucks may seem to be moving at random during the rut, there is often method to their madness. During this phase, mature bucks that cover the most prime locations are likely to do the most breeding. The wind aids them in doing so fast and effectively.

As opposed to running wildly around a field, sniffing doe after doe, one pass on the
downwind side swiftly answers if any are ready. While doing so, they can also scent
check the trails for any hot does that have recently entered or exited the field.

All of this makes the downwind side of prime food sources a good place to sit. To
further stack the odds, stands placed 15 to 20 yards in off inside corners can be great
choices. Here, the hunter can cover the bucks running the edge as deep as 40 yards
in, intercept those walking the edge and one that may be following a doe on the worn
trail that all inside corners seem to have

Furthermore, bucks often cut just inside these inside corners when getting from one side of the field to the other Doing this provides the quickest route that offers the safety of cover. All of these
things can be taken advantage of when hunting the downwind corners.

Finally, as was the case while scraping running the downwind edges of doe bedding areas is the most effective means for a buck to check the bedded does. Placing stands 20 yards off the edge, covering the pest entrance/exit trail, positions the hunter to intercept most of this movement as well as providing the chance that a hot doe will lead a buck past your stand.

The story of my 2004 Illinois buck is a good example of how this can pay off. During a spring scouting trip I had found an area where the mature woods had been selectively logged. One patch along a ridge finger had been logged harder than the rest. The combination of the thicker regrowth, extra downed tops and view of the more open creek bottom below all resulted in a prime family group bedding area.

On the surface, it seemed like bucks could be working it from any side. Further analysis revealed that the wind direction, would be the keys When the wind blew down the point, it created one best route for roaming bucks. By skirting the lower·edge, they could scent-check all the does
in the bedding area as well as well as use their eyes to scan the creek bottom below.

The first November morning providing this wind found me in that stand, My
sit was short and sweet.

Around 8 a.m., the large-bodied, high-beamed beamed 9-pointer appeared. As I had
hoped, he was skirting the lower edge of the thicket. Coming in on a string, his
head alternated between tilting up to check the wind and turning back to use his
eyes to scan the creek bottom below.

At about 50 yards out, I drew and set tied my knuckle behind my ear. Coming to
a stop, he intently scanned the creek bottom for does. Turning just a bit as he did
I let the arrow fly. As the arrow sunk in, the buck took flight for the creek bottom.
Folding as he neared the bank, the chocolate—racked buck was mine.

The wind had delivered my second buck of 2004.


Wind Tactics Yield Success

Wind directions play an important role in a mature buck’s life. It aids them in survival
as well as being a huge help in finding receptive does Because of that, it only
makes sense that we incorporate this into our hunting strategies. Once you do you just
might find that predicting buck movement can be much easier than you realized. >>—->

ARCHIVED BY
www.ARCHERYTALK.com
All Rights Reserved

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Published by archerchick on 12 Jan 2011

Buddy System Bowhunting ~By Joe Byers

Bowhunting World October 2005


BOWHUNTING WORLD
OCTOBER 2005

BUDDY SYSTEM BOWHUNTING By Joe Byers

Friends and family add spice to stick-and-string hunting. You’ll cover more ground, hunt more effectively, and double your fun afield.

I Fully Expected To Die
Dreading the crushing jaws of a savage brown tear. I clutched
the handle of my .44 Magnum pistol, thumb on the hammer,
finger on the trigger, throughout the night. Dozing occassionally,
I tried not to think of the 1,000-pound beasts splashing
about in the salmon stream less than 50 yards away.
“How come I have to sleep next to the entrance of the tent ?”
I complained to the outfitter.
“Don’t worry,” he said, having fun with my fright. “Bears
don’t always come through the doorway.”

That first night on Kodiak Island was the most harrowing
of my life. Fortunately, I had invited Bill “Bump” McKinley,
a high school acquaintance to join me. During the next seven
days, Bump and I developed a bond that has lasted nearly 2O
years. At first, our relationship was based on mutual dependence.
We shared equipment, helped pack game. explored unknown
mountains, and for a brief time became “mountain men of old.”
Today, we share treestand secrets, black bear hunts (now with
much greater confidence) and everything involving the outdoors.

Buddies Increase Effectiveness
Bowhunting is often a solitary, secretive sport. An archer may
slip softly to a treestand, spend the day in simple solitude and
gaze thankfully toward the setting sun. relishing the peace and
tranquility of a day without telephones and the stress of modern
life. Most treestands don’t have a shotgun seat because two fellows ,
hunting side by side create more movement. scent. and create
a dilemma—who shoots first? The most effective tactics for
whitetail deer dictate a solitary, well camouflaged, scent-free
hunter waiting silently at a prospective crossing.

Treestand hunting may be solitary, yet a buddy system approach
can make you more effective for whitetails and other game. Plus,
you’ll have lots more fun. Scouting is far more effective in pairs,
since discreet sign is much easier to find with four eyes and two
perspectives. Having a friends ear at local sporting shops and tuned
into general deer hunting discussions can pay big benefits. When
your phone rings and your bow-bud explodes with the news of a
big buck seen crossing the road or missed by a disgruntled archer,
you have a starting place for a trophy buck.

For example, African hunter Steve Kobrine and Jeff Harrison,
the urban deer specialist from Frederick Maryland, became
friends five years ago. Kobrine raises Nyala in South Africa and
only gets to hunt a few weeks in the states each fall. Kobrine put
Harrison onto his best stands, encouraging him to hunt in his
absence. Harrison reciprocates with the latest information and
best places to hunt when his buddy returns to the States. lnternational
bowhunting buddies may be the extreme, yet each per·
son is a more effective hunter in the process.
?

Many archers begin a hunt together and then head toward
separate stands. The advent of portable radios allows one
hunter to converse with another. lf he gets a shot, he can summon
his friend to help begin the trailing process. Working in
tandem, one archer can search while the other holds or marks
“last blood.” While one person searches for sign, the other can
watch ahead vigilantly in case a second shot is needed.
Once recovered, a buddy can be a tremendous assistance in field
dressing the animal. Positioning the animal, managing knives,
gloves, and gear, is greatly aided by a buddy. Dragging the beast to
the nearest access point is physically and emotionally easier.

Taking this a step further, most state laws require that a deer
carcass be retrieved in its entirety. A buddy will allow you to
hunt places less likely to be visited by solo archers. Steep terrain
and long distances are two hurdles that tend to develop
greater age structure (and bigger racks) in whitetail deer. Having
a buddy share the exertion can pay big benefits. Should you
both get lucky, you make two trips.
A buddy system improves your chances on most game
taken by calling, stalking and decoying, With turkeys, predators,
moose, and a host of other game, four eyes and legs are
better than a single set. After spotting a bedded muley buck,
having a friend provide hand signals can be invaluable. Ante»
lope decoying is exciting sport and much easier if a friend holds
the decoy. Will Primos, as evidenced in his video series, has
honed the buddy system for calling elk to a science. (Truth V
l Big Bulls is the latest.)


“Every animal has its own characteristics,” says Primos. “Bull
elk are often concerned about being blindsided by another bull,
and they protect their flanks. It wants to see the movement
of a cow, and in real thick places will hold up to look for the
calling animal. We like to have the caller 75 to 1OO yards
behind the shooter. Elk usually don’t circle like whitetails.
There is so much competition for cows that bulls come straight
in. This system has worked great for us and will increase your
success rate by 100 percent. Let one person do the calling and
the other do the shooting. It has worked wonders.”
A hunting buddy can make you a more effective hunter and
provide that extra impetus to embark upon a trip of a lifetime.
CIA “agents” (Central Iowa Archery, that is) Ray Neil and Craig
Wendt practice and shoot tournaments regulariy. They answered Africa’s call
together, having the time of their lives. Wendt saw five species of big game his
first afternoon and had two rhinos under his stand the second.
Talk about hunting stories!

Perfect Practice Makes Perfect
A person who has been bowhunting 10 years may have years of experience
or one year of experience IO times. When we practice, tune, and hunt
alone, we tend to do the same things the same way, year after year. Having a
hunting buddy, especially one who is comfortable making suggestions, allows
you to gain from his knowledge as well. I have hunted with headnets for many
years, primarily to cover the shine on my face. Once while hunting with Bump
on a minus-20-degree day, he explained how keeping his face covered with the
headnet had a dramatic warming effect. Since then I’ve carried a headnet in cold
weather and wear it, often over face camo paint. As you expand your hunting
circles, small tips and tactics from friends will increase your effectiveness.

Practice, like exercise, can be boring. Realistic 3·D targets pump up the
volume, yet the enjoyment of these figures can be improved through interaction.
Buddies add pressure and anxiety elements that are often missing from effective
practice regimens. Competitions inevitably evolves between shooters
Whether it’s the prestige of winning or the burden of paying for the Coke round,
practicing with buddies adds realism and greatly magnifies the enjoyment of archery.

Tuning, judging arrow flight, estimating distance, learning your effective range
and many more elements of bowhunting, will improve dramatically if undertaken
in an interactive environment. Also, you will stick to your practice schedule more
consistently with motivation from a friend. When you promise to shoot early
on Sunday morning, you’d better keep your cell phone on or face a raft of good
natured kidding next time.
?

Maybe you and your buddy will agree on the best bow, arrows, and broadhead.
Probably not! Much of the fun and enjoyment of archery comes from
analyzing and debating the elements of gear. Since each piece of equipment
will function according to the user, there may not be a “right” answer. In the
long run, this debate helps you and your buddy understand gear, how
it works, and why.

Of Stick, String, And Heart
My friendship with Bump had an air of predictability. We were about the same
age, grew up in the same town, and both loved to hunt. However, friend-
ships and special hunting relationships can spring from unusual or accidental
circumstances, even with rifle hunters. “l first met Dale Earnhardt in l992
at a hunting lodge in Michigan where l was filming whitetails,” said David
Blanton, producer of Realtree’s Monster Buck series. “The Realtree TV show
had just started, and l was getting deer behavioral footage. The guys at the
lodge mentioned that Dale was coming in to hunt. l had heard the name and
knew that he was a racer, but l didn’t know much about NASCAR or Dale.
?

That evening, l was working in the basement of the lodge when he
walked into the room. ` “‘What are you doing,’ he asked with sincere
interest. ” I’m logging deer footage,” l said with a welcoming glance.
He pulled up a stool, and l soon found out that he had come down here
to escape the hustle of the lodge and the attention people were giving him.
Dale was in the public spotlight, and he didn’t like that. He tolerated it, yet it
was not something he craved. He came down for some peace and quiet.
We talked into the wee hours of the morning about where he lived, the fence
he put up to raise deer and about deer hunting. l really saw how much he
loved deer. l think the fact that l was not in awe of him as a racer was the
reason we hit it off so big from day one.

“l will be hunting in the morning” said Dale as we finally headed up stairs.
“Why don’t you bring your camera?” We started by rattling deer. He was
intrigued by how we set up our equipment. That I could move around in
the woods quietly. He appreciated that. He started rattling and l had a grunt
call. It was his first grunt call experience, and he was surprised what it could
do. He was amazed. l ended up filming him killing a deer. and then we went
our separate ways.
?

“Two years later, he called me at work. We began hunting together and going to
North Carolina and to film deer. We always had such a big time together.”
Blanton continues, “Our relationship was centered around hunting. He didn’t
have many close relationships in life where he didn’t feel like he was being
used because he was a racing star. He felt very suspicious. It was racing but
deer that brought us together. l spent time at his place at North Carolina where a
very deep friendship develop. It continued through the years, and we hunted together
in Texas, Mexico, Michigan, Iowa, Utah, and each spring we hunted Georgia for turkeys.
I always gave Dale his room because he hunted like he drove – with very little patience,
wide open. That didn’t go hand in hand with video taping. There were times when Dale
and I really disagreed. He tried to hut like he raced, with little regard for the camera. We
clashed several times, but the fact that I was not in awe of him strengthened our friendship.
Dale always wanted to tell me about priorities in life. He’d call me up and say, “David, how much you been traveling?” knowing that it was fall and I travel a lot. He’d always talk about
keeping my family first. “Don’t let your career become more important than your family” he’d advise, asking in particular about my wife, Ginger.

He was such a genuinely thoughtful person. A very few people knew that outside of his family.
We talked about family and life while hunting. Dale was the first close friend I ever lost suddenly.
l wasn’t able to tell them good-bye. l treasure and value the conversations that we had in
treestands from Texas to Michigan to Mexico so much now. I will never forget the simple
conversations about family, God, and life in general. So many things we talked about that were confidential at the time and still are. Dale was a true sportsman, and so concerned about getting young people involved.

Little Buddies, Big Benefits
In our nation are millions of young girls and boys who yearn to explore the outdoors and will consider archery “very cool.” Each of us is a potential role model for archery and hunting. If
you demonstrate the fun, excitement, and enjoyment of the conservation ethic the youth of America will look up to us and bowhunting.

Girls’ Clubs, Boys’ Clubs, Scouts, 4-H and dozens of other youth groups welcome
speakers and/or a modest shooting-demonstration. The chance to nock an arrow or
just pull back a timber longbow is a big thrill to a child. When doing archery demonstrations at outdoor camps, I always put the target (balloons are great ) at “can’t miss” range. I remember
one second-grade girl who was very hesitant about pulling the bow, then exclaiming “Wow! Now I know what I want for Christmas.”

Introducing youngsters to stick and string is important, yet they need that special buddy
treatment to get them started. I grew up in a working family where my dad taught school all day long and farmed half the night. l don’t remember ever having a game of catch in the back yard,
yet we had and still have good times afield. Some sons have personal conflicts with their fathers, yet the hunting denominator creates a solid foundation in their relationships. lIve never been
able to persuade my dad to pick up a bow, yet we often hunt together when he totes a rifle or shotgun, and l a compound. We have driven non-stop 45 hours cross-country to hunt elk
dozen times, frozen in treestands. and told and relived the related adventures
countless times.
?

Closer Than You Think
Don’t overlook the lady who shares your life. Your best friend of the opposite sex
could be the best bowhunting buddy of all. Your relationship will elevate to another
level once you share the thrills and excitement of the outdoors. Brenda Valentine,
Kathy Butt, and countless other female archers have shattered all of the depend-
ency stereotypes. These gals can hunt!
?

Even Mom can get into the act. Frank Lindenberger, a taxidermist and
ardent archer from Pennsylvania, convinced Mary Ann, his mother, to join
him on a safari in South Africa with Ken Moody Safaris. “Exhilaration is an
understatement,” she said as she described her first day in a bow blind.
“The adrenaline flows, the heart palpitates and the breathing accelerates. all
the good things about hunting.” At times Ken and Mary Ann sat a blind
together, sometimes laughing so hard they worried about scaring game.
Finally, bowhunting buddy systems have a “big-picture” benefit. Americans
take bowhunting for granted, yet in most of Europe and England, hunting with
archery gear is strictly outlawed. Animal rights activists hate hunters of all sorts,
and often employ backhanded litigations to reduce or eliminate bowhunting
options. By working together in conservation and bowhunting advocacy
organizations, we can assure that the conservation heritage we enjoy
today will be preserved for future generations.

Bowhunting buddies come in all shapes, sizes, colors, and genders.
Extending the hand of friendship to a novice, fellow archer, even a stranger
may change both lives in unimagineable ways. Remember: Arrows fletched in
friendship always group tightly.

ARCHIVED BY
www.ARCHERYTALK.com
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Published by archerchick on 11 Jan 2011

25 Calling Tips-The Right Call At The Right Time ~By Bill Vaznis

Bowhunting World October 2005


BOWHUNTING WORLD
October 2005

25 Calling Tips by Bill Vaznis

The Right Call At The Right Time

There are two accessories I always take afield with me
these days.The first is a quality pair of binoculars. They
can help me see deer skulking in the shadows that would
otherwise go undetected. And the second is a deer call.
If I am careful, a single note can lure that buck into bow
range as if I possessed a magic flute – a buck I might add
that could easily walk out of my life forever. Do grunt
tubes work all the time? No, but most experts are pleased
if they can get one out of 10 bucks to respond favorably to
their renditions. Here are 25 tips to help insure that you will
be more than pleased on your next hunt.
?

EARLY SEASON
1. Try starting the opening day off
with a bit of rattling. Not hard
and harsh, mind you, but soft and
easy. You want to imitate two bucks
sparring in order to test each other’s
strength and weaknesses. A rattle bag
seems to work best here. ]ust rub the bag
back and forth between your hands for
1O or 15 seconds at a time, and then
grab your bow. This low-level grinding
is sure to tweak the curiosity of any
passing buck.

2. One of the problems calling to
whitetails during the early season
is the response rate. Bucks are not
worked up enough to be attracted to
a knock down, drag-out buck fight, nor are
they likely to come-a-running to an estrous
doe bleat. They will, however, investigate
a contact grunt from a young buck or doe,
or the plaintive bleat of a fawn. The trick
here is to key in on food sources and then
setup an ambush in a nearby staging area
that offers plenty of cover.
?

3. Or, try calling right outside a
buck’s preferred bedding area late
in the morning or an hour or so
before darkness. This is risky business, but
if you are careful, it can work on your very
first attempt; What call should you use?
A couple of moderately toned contact
grunts could send that bedded buck into
a frenzy. Why? Your rendition might be
interpreted as a younger buck invading
his territory to look for does.

?

BLIND CALLING TIPS

1. Yearling buck grunts, doe bleats,
doe-in-heat bleats, moderately
toned buck grunts, fawn bleats, buck
contact grunts, yearling buck tending
grunts and even fawn-in-distress bleats
are all proven deer calls. Indeed, each
fall knowledgeable hunters who know
how to imitate these basic vocalizations
in the wild tag thousands and thousands
of whitetail deer. It is the buck contact
grunt, doe~in-heat bleat and the series
of moderately toned tending buck grunts
that bag the most bucks however—
three easy calls to master.

2. Don’t be afraid to use your deer
call. Sure, improper calling can
spook a buck into the next
county, but more often than not you will
learn something about deer behavior
that can be used successfully later in
your career. You might, for example, learn
how quickly a buck will pinpoint your
exact location if you and your treestand
are not well·camouflaged.

3. When blind calling, start your
calling sequence with the volume
turned down low. A buck might
be standing nearby and come running
in to investigate. If your rendition
sounds more like a foghorn, however, a
nearby buck might vamoose without
you ever knowing he was close at hand.
?

4. Always have an arrow nocked and
ready to go before you start calling
to unseen deer. It only takes a
second for a buck to step into view and he
will be on high alert, leaving you precious
little time to prepare for a shot. One P&Y
Iowa buck, for example, came in so fast and
stopped so close to me I could not nock an
arrow without alerting him to my presence.
He escaped unscathed.?

5. Just because a buck doesn’t
respond immediately to your
calling does not mean he is not
going to come in for a look-see. He may
take 1O minutes, he might take an hour,
so don’t give up hope. Indeed, more than
one buck has been known to circle
around and show up on the downwind
side of a treestand long after the
bowhunter relaxed his guard.

6. Be sure to test the upper limits of
every grunt tube you plan on
taking into the woods with you
before you step afield. Some models lose
their tonal qualities when you blow hard,
causing a squeak that is sure to alert
any nearby deer. Don’t discard these
odd-sounding calls, however. Sometimes
a simple reed adjustment is all it takes to
bring the grunt tube back up to specs. If
that doesn’t help, save the parts. It is
amazing what authentic sounding deer
calls you can build when you mix and
match barrels, reeds and ribbed tubing!


ADD REALISM?

1. If you should snap a twig while
still-hunting or walking to your
stand and jump a deer, try a confidence
call. I like to imitate the soft
mew of a fawn as they always seem to be
stumbling about, but avoid the use of a
fawn-in-distress call. I can’t imagine a
scenario where this would help you bag
a buck holding steady on red alert. A
single low doe bleat might also calm
down any nearby deer.
?

2. If you are hunting from ground
zero, and a buck hangs up just out
of range, try grunting, bleating,
mewing or rattling from a different location.
This is a killer maneuver if you can
pull it off without being seen. Raking
an antler up and down a tree trunk, or
pawing at the ground with a stick might
be all it takes then to get that buck to
finally commit himself to the setup.
?

3. Learn to double up on your calls.
For example, try a doe-in-heat
bleat followed by a short series
of tending buck grunts. This is a hot
combination during the pre-rut as well
as the peak of the rut. A lost fawn bleat
followed by a doe-in-heat bleat and
then a tending buck grunt can be the
ticket when the rut is in full swing.
Why? A nearby buck will “think” a hot
doe is about to be bred by a buck in
attendance. The “lost” fawn only adds
realism to the ruse as does routinely
abandon their fawns while being bred.

4. When doubling up on your vocalizations,
use a single-purpose call
and couple that with notes from
a variable grunt tube. It adds a bit of realism
to your calling strategy as it sounds like
two distinctly different deer.


PEAK OF THE RUT
1. You will know the rut has kicked
in when you see bucks lingering
around feeding areas preferred
by family groups of does and fawns well
after sunrise. They will be searching for
does by scent-checking the edges of openings
and by staring off into thick wooded
areas for several moments at a time. This
is a good time to give a roving buck what
he is expecting to find—a family group
of does and fawns. He will quickly zero
in on a couple of fawn bleats followed by
a doe bleat or two. Keep your eyes and
ears open, but don’t be afraid to blind call
every 15 minutes or so, either.

2. Bucks love to cruise the edges of
major waterways during the rut
in their seemingly never-ending
search for a doe in estrus. To narrow
your search and pinpoint an exact calling
location, look for inlets and bays that
funnel bucks close to the shoreline or
“around the horn” as they trot from one
side of the bay to the other.

3. You can set up a treestand on a
downwind edge of the bedding
area, or still-hunt in and around
the thick stuff. Either way, calling blindly
to bucks by using doe-in-heat bleats
followed by moderately toned tending
buck grunts will work. Stay alert and be
ready to shoot at all times because the
action can be fast and furious!

?
SPECIALTY CALLS
1. When a buck is in the company
of an estrous doe near the very
peak of her cycle, he will often
make a clicking noise just moments prior
to copulation. It sounds much like someone
dragging their thumbnail across the
teeth of a plastic comb, with each individual
click separate and distinct.

When the rut is in full swing, this
clicking will signify to a passing mature
buck that a hot doe is somewhere nearby,
and that mating is about to take place. Use
a moderately toned or high-pitched series
of clicking, and a sexually experienced trophy
buck just might believe that a younger and less-mature
buck is about to breed, and rush in to
take over the breeding rites. A buck
decoy with a small to medium rack
might just help you complete the ruse.

2. A snort-wheeze is made by a
buck exhaling air through his
nose in a very specific cadence.
Once you have heard it, you won’t forget
it. It occurs when two bucks of similar status
suddenly encounter each other
around a food source or a doe near estrus,
and serves as a warning to the intruder
buck to back off or there will be a fight.
A buck will also emit a loud snort-
wheeze when a hot doe refuses to stand
still long enough to allow breeding to
take place. The buck is undoubtedly
warning the doe to stand still—or else!
The snort-wheeze seems to work best
during the peak of the rut when mature
bucks are tending does. Your rendition
of a snort-wheeze, either alone or added
to a tending buck grunt or an estrous doe
bleat, may be all it takes to pull a mature
buck away from a hot doe. But be pre~
pared, however, as any nearby buck will
probably come in looking for a fight!

3. If you prefer to still-hunt, as I do,
and want to call a buck in closer for
a clean shot, try a few contact buck
grunts followed by your
version of a buck making a rub—complete
with swaying sapling. lt sounds
gimmicky, but it works for me at least
once a year!
?

WHEN NOT TO CALL
Do not keep calling if the buck
does not respond in a timely
manner. He may simply not
want to come over for a look-see, so let
him go for another day. The last thing
you want to do is educate him on your
imitation grunts and bleats.

2. Do not call again if the he
appears to have heard your call
and is already working his way
toward you. Additional grunts or bleats
may only serve to confuse him or, worse
alert him to the fact that you are not
another deer.
?

3. Do not call if the buck is already
in bow range, or is looking at
you or for you just out of range
If he pegs you, the game is over. Instead
hold your ground, and let him make
the next move. lf he turns to walk away
hit him with another note. This is
another case where a decoy, buck or a
doe, can help as the buck’s attention will
be riveted on the decoy.
?

LATE-SEASON STRATEGIES

In most late-season hunts, “doe
tags” are still valid and, in fact
antlerless deer are often the
main quarry. Fawn bleats can stir a doe’s
curiosity to the point where she will
come in for a cautious look-see, whereas
a loud blast from a fawn-in-distress specialty
call can still bring a doe charging
in to rescue a stricken fawn.

2. Of course, if it is a buck you are
after, then you really have your
work out out for you! In most
cases as long as he has his rack, he is
willing and able to breed. Thus an estrous
doe bleat is always a good choice, with or
without an estrous doe decoy, positioned
facing the buck with her back legs askew.
With this setup it is imperative you
choose your treestand site carefully,
making sure you are high above the
ground and well concealed.
If your call freezes up during the
late season, you are calling too
much. Slow down, and call
more sparingly. A squeaking note now
will undoubtedly end your season.

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Published by toynrnd on 11 Jan 2011

Range finders

I would like some information about range finders I am getting ready to buy one I have been doing alot of reserch I am stuck on two of them now the nikon archers choice and the leuopuld rx II please help with any info thank you everyone

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Published by travissalinas on 11 Jan 2011

spot and stalk bobcat

while walking the roads we at the lease, the light was about finished
when we spotted a few deer, the fellow i was hunting with thought he
saw a yearling close to us, i watched it a bit longer because it was
acting a bit strange, turned out to be a cat prowling the road for
dinner. we closed the distance from about 275 yards down to about 80.
the cat was working its way towards us so i decided to back off into
the brush and wait for him to pass. a rabbit was evening making
squeaks in the brush, the center of the noise in a point puitting us
in the line of the cat. after waiting about 5 minutes, the lighting
was faint. i knew it was know or never, so i drew back my arrow and
started slipping towards the road, i could see a dark spot that looked
like a the bcat sitting on its haunches staring at me from about 15
yards away. if ever a sabo sight worked great, it was in this
sitution. it was so dark i had to use both eyes to see the dark spot
and i put my illuminated red dot on the center of what i believed to
be the cat shape and let loose. the other big perk of technology was
the lighted arrow nock. the notcturnal lit green and its arc contacted
something solid, followed by the crunch of rocks. the bobcat shape
exploded to lift in a magnificent flipping leap at least 5 foot
verticle and yowling a blood curdling noise, the cat sped away and i
ran fully into the road to watch him leave. my lighted nock had become
detached from the arrow, a sign of hitting something very hard and my
heart sunk. then i noticed fur and meat on the nock, game on! i found
a few drops of blood, then decided to let the cat sit a spell while we
picked up the truck, kim, and the secret weapon.

with a few pockets full of flashlights, we unfurled the secret weapon
and Slice immediately bristled at this new scent. down the trail of
fresh blood we went, Slice much more tense than normal. we followed
the cat through some of the thickest and nastiest brush that south
texas has to offer. slice would pass cleanly into the blackbrush and
cat claw thickets while we humans decided to meet her on the other
side. the first 300 yards of the trail were in a fairly straight line,
but in the last 100 yards, the cat had begun to curl back. we had good
blood and about twenty minutes and 400 yards into this trail all hell
broke loose.

fierce barking and angry growls eminated from a nasty thicket white
brush. chris, kim and myself got up into the action and the cat broke
away, slice hot on his heels and then she bayed him 10 yards away in
the thicket. Kim showed her true feelings about slice when slice began
yelping as kim screamed, “Slice, save Slice”. a 22 mag to the head and
the cat was ours! he weight about 31 lbs live and had a big block
head. Every was pretty pumped after the rumble and tumble through the
brush. Slice came away with only a scratch on her shoulder.

this cat is pretty special, it took a long time to finally get one,
and a great one he is. i plan to get him mounted in a fighting stance,
and when slice goes to doggie heaven, get her mounted in her attack
pose so they can be forever mounted in mortal combat.

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Published by archerchick on 11 Jan 2011

Bulls At The Buzzer ~By Jeff Murray

Bowhunting World October 2005


BOWHUNTING WORLD
OCTOBER 2005

BULLS AT THE BUZZER By Jeff Murray

A golden sunset should have been framed with the sound of elk music. But the only thing golden
about my day was that it was about to be over. Where were all the bulls? How
can l be in two places at once? My mind races with questions that beg answers.
But all l can do is slump forward to catch my breath and try to clear my mind.
indeed, clear thinking is the name of the game when the pressure’s on. You see,
my Colorado elk archery season is slipping away. In fact, my hunting season now
boils down to 13 hours of hunting light. In bowhunting terms, that’s 780 minutes (or 46,800 seconds) to pull off an upset at the buzzer. If you ever find yourself in this predicament, here’s what to do when you think you’re one neuron short of a synapse.

WHY BETTER LATE
THAN NEVER LATE

Sound game plans consist of sound components. One of them is flexibility. (I’ve
killed a lot of bulls on the 10th day of a seven-day hunt) But when you’re down
to the wire, you can’t just sit there. You have to do something! Which begs the
question: Why would anyone pick a hunt that ends when a state legislature or conservation department says so? I’ll tell you why: Because the bottom end of archery
season is better than the top end for, well, top-end bulls. While I’ve always suspected
this was true. the last couple of seasons taught me how true it is. All you need is
one good reason, but here are three:

First, weather is almost always more
of a help than a hindrance at the tag end of the season. You simply cannot ignore
the fact that searing temperatures put bulls down. And it goes from bad to
worse when a drought overlaps a heatwave. Give me frost or a little dusting
snow and l promise you elk will be on the move, oftentimes migrating predictably
from summer ranges at timberline to winter ranges at lower elevations.

Second, aggressive calling tactics rule the roost this time of year. In fact
there are so many strategies to choose from that l might have too many in my
quiver of tricks, More on this later and third, the biology of this phase of the rut makes bulls more susceptible to bowhunters than at any other time of year (again, lots more below). Add it up,
and the math is sound: The last week is the best week. That being the case,
here’s a fistful of strategies for ending the season with a bang.

THE BUDDY MANEUVER
l used to hunt with a guy who was a recluse. He avoided hunting with other
guys mainly because he thought it compromised his hunting opportunities.
Yet lied often complain about monster bulls tied call within bow range but couldn`t
get broadside. l’m wired differently. lt`s no secret that l relish the opportunity to
double -up on elk with my like·minded buddies. We’re an unselfish crew and
seem to have matured into enjoying each others’ successes as much as our
own. lf that describes you, then you’re in a good place. Now’s the best time to
buddy-up on a bull.

“[The late season] is tailor-made for aggressive calling, and that means the
more callers, the better,” says Ralph Ramos, a veteran New Mexico guide
appearing often in these pages over the years. It’s not uncommon [for me] to set up two hunters with two or more callers. You need good communication, and you need to read the situation properly, but it’s a tactic that’s loaded with potential for
this time of year.” It’s been said that a pessimist sees a calamity in every challenge, and that an
optimist sees a challenge in every calamity. There’s a challenge here, all right, but how you handle it determines whether or not it ends in calamity. So let’s set up the setup. “Most bowhunters don’t separate themselves far enough from the callers,” Ramos began. “When [l`m calling] l like to get anywhere from 90 to 150 yards away from my hunters. Most guys set up 30 to 40 yards away, like they’re hunting turkeys. This simply doesn’t allow you to maneuver the bulls.”
Man, is Ramos ever right on.

Early in my bowhunting career l`d routinely get stuck in the proverbial 150-yard hangup: I’d get pinned as I watched the bull I desperately wanted pace back and forth out of bow range. Occasionally he’d bluff·charge 40 to So yards closer, giving me false hopes he’d end up in my lap. But he rarely did. Now I realize it was my fault. I needed better separation from my buddy’s calling. One-hundred-fifty yards may seem like a long way, but take Ramos’ advice: Better to be too far apart than too close. Next, you need to decide how aggressive you want to get and how soon you want to get aggressive. This is a critical decision, especially with the waning
season on the line. “When the caller keeps the proper distance from the hunter, you’ve got options,” Ramos continued. The hunter should be thinking how best to close the gap while his
caller concentrates on distracting the bull. I want to really work over the bull so he thinks he’s got plenty of space to protect his cows and bugle back at me. I make no attempt to keep quiet while I’m calling; I like to sound like an approaching is herd of cows with a straggling bull or two. I’m as aggressive as I can be.

Now here’s where things get dicey. If the bull appears to be drawing closer, great—you’re about to experience the moment of truth. All you have to do is get the caller to back off a little bit to make
the bull think he’s got the invading, rival bull on the defensive. The risk, of course, is challenging the bull beyond his comfort zone, which may trigger him into retreating with his harem. But drawing this line in the sand is what separates the pros like Ramos from the rest of the elk crowd.
Master this technique, and you’re about to graduate to the big leagues!

A final word on maneuvering bulls. Use common sense and you should be able to broadside a bull: If the bull is bugling to the right of the shooter, swing around to the left and call away from the
bull. Do the opposite if the bull seems to be circling wide left of the shooter. Pay strict attention to what you hearing don’t let the wind fool you—and stick with the program. It takes some practice,
but you’ll learn from every mistake. Finally, remember to make plenty of elk noise as you call.

NEW LIGHT ON DARK TIMBER
In the Desert Southwest, bulls don’t begin losing their harems till mid-October—after the completion of archery seasons—and the weather tends to remain quite balmy throughout the bow
season down there. But things are different further north, particularly in states like Wyoming, Colorado and Montana. As the bow season matures, the elk landscape transforms into a new season. For one, late September stimulates elk migrations: for another, rut dynamics change. Guide Roger McQueen notes these changes and keeps one step ahead.

“The whole key this time of year is anticipation.” he says. “You can never chase elk. You’re way better off intercepting them. That is why I do so much better scouting in dark timber; I want to be ready when the herd drops down [from] timberline.”

In a sentence, McQueen is looking for telltale clues that elk are at mid-slope. A carpet of snow certainly helps. But a sudden artic blast coud affect the location of elk bedding areas. “It’s well
known that north-facing slopes are preferred, ” he said. “That’s where the cover is thickest. But bulls will occasionally sun themselves [on the south side] if the thermometer really plummets. An elk magnet would be the head of a basin, say 7,000 feet where bulls can slip over either side of the top.”

Another dark timber axiom is cherry-picking benches -where the terrain briefly flattens out before dropping off again – along extremely steep slopes. Elk concentrate here, and it’s easier to call in bulls for broadside shots.

“Calling in the timber can be frustrating,” admits McQueen. “You have to scramble a lot to make sure the thermals don’t betray you. And it’s easy to get caught out of position because you can’t see bulls until their almost on top of you. On the flip side, you probably won’t get many 100 yard hang ups.”

Once again, the late season challenge boils down to call tactics. It all
depends on how desperate you are, says McQueen: Conventional wisdom calls for
answering a bull after he’s had a chance to speak his mind: get the conversation heat»
ing up gradually But I find that in dark timber, for some reason, I can cut off the bull- interrupt him in the middle of his bugle-with a bugle of my own. This ticks him off and often brings him in on a trot; however, in more open terrain its a big gamble and often sends the bull packing.


SLEEPING WITH THE ENEMY

Dan Evans sells Trophy Taker arrow rests for a living, but that’s just an excuse to
hunt elk in as many states as he can each fall. Evans has racked up multiple-state
kills for the past several years essentially because he hunts like respected 3-D
archer Randy Ulmer does. What do the two have in common? They sleep with elk. Evans will even bunk out in a tree if that’s what it takes to down a monster bull and Ulmer, an Arizona resident fortunate enough to hunt bulls in that state more than once in a lifetime, knows this
is the best way to score on bulls topping the 375 Pope and Young mark.

So how can the rest of us get in on the bit? First learn how to bivouac. Start
by getting yourself a backpack that’s small enough to pack inside a bigger
camp pack. The bigger pack gets you to set up at your spike camp, and the small·
er pack equips you for a two» or three day rendezvous. Now you can bed down
where the elk take you, which could be a mile or four from base camp.

“Bivouacking is made to order for the late season,” says Bryan Leck, a wiry
Colorado bowhunter who lives out of his pack for weeks on end each September.
“You waste no time and lose no sleep traveling back and to camp each day, I mean the instant
you wake up, you’re close to an elk and can start hunting. You can hunt at a higher pace from the sunrise to sunset. “While this is true, the key to this technique is securing a good water supply

Don’t Let Sleeping Dogs Lie
And speaking of not wasting time (when there’s no time to waste) I learned a valuable lesson a few years ago from New Mexico outfitter Tom Klumker. He taught me not to waste precious hours. l was obsessive compulsive about
thermals mining a hunt but, like he says, theres no hunt to ruin unless you try.

Sure, you can’t rely on down drafting thermals [like sunrise and sunset], he told me. But if you can determine the
flow of localized air currents, you can still stay downwind from elk most of the time.
Ralph Ramos agrees: “l really like midday during the last few days of the season, because a bedded bull is pretty likely to respond to your bugle. It he’s preoccupied with cows, on the other hand, he might not answer.” Ramos adds a cautionary note on exactly what a bedded bull is apt to sound like. “It’s more like a moan: oah-ah. So if you sharpen your ears and listen for this sound, the bulls are going to give up their location. And that’s what it’s all about.”

RATTLE UP A RUTTING BULL
I’ve saved the best tactic for last—rattling. My Cutting Edge column covers this hot new tactic, but here are some additional pointers to keep in mind”
• You can rattle any time, anywhere.just be sure to start with subdued sparring sounds before replicating a donnybrook encounter. Sometimes that’s all you need.
• The Sparring Bull call, pioneered by seven-time Elk Call Champion Audrey Hulsey, is for real. This intrigueing vocalization is what bulls make when they push and shove. And it can’t be effective without having to rattle.

Hot tip: To help position bulls for a quality shot, Hulsey jury-rigs an oversized plastic baseball bat to cast the:
Sparring Bull calls.
• Rattling works best when the demand for cows exceeds the supply. The
tag end of the bow season in northern elk states is about as good as it gets, since this is when bulls run out of estrous cows ,and harems become harder to manage. ;
• Satellite bulls are suckers for rattling and the spar call If you’re hunting where the satellites are impressive specimens—wilderness areas, limited entry units, private ranches——you’re in for a
real treat.
• Like bugling, two bowhunters can be more effective at rattling than one. But take Ramos’ advice and separate the rattler from the Shooter by at least 100 yards. And don’t forget to make may ruckus. Stomp your feet, shake bushes, break sticks, even tumble rocks down the slope!

About the only thing that can ruin a late-season hunt is the season ending before your tag is filled. But that shouldn’t happen if you plan ahead and make every minute count! >>—->

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Published by archerchick on 11 Jan 2011

The Perfect Morning Stand~ By Mike Strandlund

Bowhunting World October 2005


BOWHUNTING WORLD
October 2005

THE PERFECT MORNING STAND ~ By Mike Strandlund
?

On cool mornings during the rut, bedding areas may be your best bet.

If you hang around bowhunters enough, you’ll eventually hear some-
one say they were in the right place at the right time. Everyone nods
their head. The notion of time intersecting location is a well accepted
principle of bowhunting success. Nodding your head is easy, but really,
putting those two together is no simple matter. There are a lot of
trees out there and a lot of hours in the day. Making it happen by
design rather than by pure luck takes a little thought.

Big bucks can be taken at any time during the season and any time
during the day. They are always somewhere, even it you aren’t. If you
understand their behavior well enough to put yourself between their Point
A and Point B, you can manufacture your own right time and place. The
problem is, during most of the season they aren’t moving very well,
during the day, and these smart old deer are anything but predictable.
Year after year the rut comes to the rescue to put a little life into our
dreams. For a high percentage of hunters, the rut is the “right time.” But,
we deed to go a step farther. ?

In my experience, morning hunts produce more big buck sightings than
evening hunts. Hunters who spend a lot of time on stand will agree. Bucks
learn to let their guard down more in the morning and are on their feet
longer during daylight than they are in the afternoon. So, the “right time”
becomes a morning during the rut. But, why stop there? There’s more
we can use to narrow this down.

Studies I’ve read suggest that daytime buck activity north of the
Mason-Dixon tine starts to decline when the temperature gets above 45
degrees. It almost comes to a stop when the temperature reaches 60
degrees. So now the right time is a cool morning during the rut. Now all
we need is the right place.


The Right Place
For 50 weeks out of the year, bedding
areas are among the worst places you
could hunt. Try sneaking into Fort Knox
sometime. It won’t be long before the
alarms start sounding. That’s the level of
security deer exhibit in a bedding area for
most of the year. If a buck catches you
sneaking around his bedding area, he’s
gone. Just as a good burglar knows that
the best time to make a raid is when the
residents are out of town, we have our
own window of opportunity to hunt bedding
areas effectively during the rut.
During the two weeks that comprise
the peak-breeding phase of the rut, a high
percentage of the bucks are “out of town.”
They’re distracted from normal wariness by
the hope of cornering a doe, and they’re moving
more in the process spending time in places
where they haven’t taken a stick-by-stick and
leaf-by-leaf mental inventory.?

The one you see today may be miles away
tomorrow. You can afford to push a little
harder when the buck turnover rate is high.
When does are in estrus (characterizing
the peak breeding phase), mature bucks
spend most of their time looking for them.
Where do they go? Where would you go?
Feeding areas in the evening and bedding
areas in the morning.
Choosing the bedding areas you will
hunt depends a lot more on how you will get
in and out than on any other single factor.
Start with access, then move on to wind
control and finally worry about the specific
tree you’ll hunt.

Access
Bucks are slow to arrive in bedding areas
in the morning, so they won’t be the ones
that bust you if you make a sloppy approach.
Maybe you are thinking, “So what if I blow out
a couple of does?” It’s a big mistake because
if you push the does out, the bucks will stop
using the whole area eventually, plus any
deer that remain will display tense body
language that will bring the bucks to a
greater state of caution. Soon they will
stop moving naturally through the area. If
you can’t get to and from the stand without
spooking deer, you are actually hurting
your entire hunting area. That’s why getting
in clean is so important.


?

Bedding areas generally have a back
door that makes access easy. You have to
approach from the opposite direction as
the deer. In other words, you have to come
in from the direction away from the primary
food source. Surprisingly, some bedding
area stands can be hunted day after day if
the entry and exit routes are well-selected.
The only way you burn out a stand is if the
deer know you are using it. Keep them in
the dark and the stand can be productive
for the entire two weeks.
Take advantage of every trick to keep
deer from seeing you, smelling you and
hearing you as you approach the stand.
I’ve learned the value of setting stands
close to high-banked ditches and creeks. I
use the bank for cover as I walk right down
in the bottom, beneath the surrounding
terrain. I’ve walked right past deer this
way many times.
?

Another trick is to approach your
morning stands right at first light. It may
sound like heresy to hard-core bowhunters,
but I’ve found that sleeping in actually
works to your benefit when the woods are
dry and noisy underfoot. Wait until you can
just see the ground before heading to the
stand, and then walk rapidly. Rapid-fire
movements spook deer less than quiet
sounds of stealth. Also, there is a time
right at daybreak when the forest comes
to life and the sounds you make aren’t
singled out as easily.
?

Wind
The best bedding area stands
are located near ridge tops. Of course, you
have to go where the deer are, but given a
choice, hunt high where the wind is steady.
The wind is always steadier on high ground
than in areas that are protected and subject
to swirling. As a bonus, when you set up on
the downwind edge of a ridge top, the wind
will carry your scent above the deer down-
wind of your stand for a long distance. With
attention to eliminating odor, you should
be able to prevent most of the deer from
ever scenting you while on stand. If you’re
looking for a way to make your best start
productive for longer, this is a big one.

Be Conservative
While scouting I’ve seen a lot of stands
that are “one-hunt wonders.” I know
perfectly well what they look like because
I’ve put up my share of them over the years.
They are great for one hunt and then they go
downhill because too many deer scent you or run
across your ground scent. Generally, these
stands are the result of a combination of
greed and naivete. We long to be right in
the middle of the action, but that always
comes at a high cost. You will get busted
often – plain and simple. And, soon deer
will stop using the area around the stand.

There is no place I’ve ever hunted
where wild whitetails will tolerate human
presence without avoiding the area in the
future. Instead of hunting right in the Middle
of a bedding area and educating deer,
choose a tree on the fringe. Put your stand
on the backside of the tree, away from the
deer. You will have to stand facing the
tree most of the time, but the tree will
serve to keep you well-hidden even
from short range.
?

Accept the fact that you’ll have to watch
a few deer pass out of range. Be patient;
eventually one will come to the downwind
side of the ridge (your side) and you’ll get
a good shot. In the meantime, you will keep
the deer relaxed and moving naturally. Over
the long haul, that’s the key to successful
bowhunting.

Picking The Tree
Choosing an actual stand location in a bedding
area can be as much luck as skill. There is almost
no buck sign to guide you. By their very
nature, bedding areas aren’t travel routes.
You won’t find many trails or traditional
funnels to suggest the best stand location
There isn’t a single big rub, scrape or
trail visible from any of my best morning
stands. This is the hardest part for many
bowhunters to overcome. Too often, sign
becomes our only focus and we overlook
great stand locations as a result.

Buck movement patterns through bedding
areas seem on the surface to be
random. In most cases, the bucks follow
some kind of a pattern even if the pattern
is known only to them. In time, you will see
it start to develop. Certain places will seem to
be visited more often by bucks on the move,
or a certain tree will just seem to be common
to many of the paths taken by cruising bucks.
lt may take a couple of years for this to gel, but
you will end up with an awesome stand if you
are patient and watchful.

Occasionally you’ll actually find funnels
in bedding areas, though they tend to
be broad and very general in form. When
hunting ridges l look for areas where narrow
hogbacks in the ridge force traveling
bucks to come closer together. This simply
increases your odds that a buck passing through
the area will be within range.
Often, in other types of bedding areas,
you’ll find something subtle that pushes
deer toward one side or the other. It may
even be as simple as a big fallen tree
deer have to go around. Anything that
funnels movement (no matter how slightly)
tips the odds a little more your way and
is worth using to your advantage.

A saddle is another feature that really
improves ridge hunting success. Bucks
use the saddle to cross over the ridge
serving as a second travel route when hunting
bucks that are cruising along the ridge itself.

Remain Undetected
Does often browse for an hour or more
when they get back into a bedding area.
They rarely bed right down. This can be a
tough time because as the does mill around, a few
invariably start to drift over to your stand.
If the setup isn’t perfect you will get busted.

I’ve also had entire family groups bed
down for hours at a time within 10 yards
of my tree. That makes life miserable
because you can’t move to stretch or even
change positions. This is rare, however
because you can usually count on some
kind of buck to come along and run them
out before too long.

?

More Thoughts On Timing

When you start noticing bucks seriously
chasing does, it’s time to start spending
your mornings hunting bedding areas
Here‘s what you can expect.

The bucks that visit doe bedding areas
aren’t interested in bedding down, at least
not until late in the morning. After several
years of hunting bedding areas in the morning,
I’ve only seen a few bucks actually bed
down. instead of bedding, the bucks cruise
through with the intention of checking as
many does as possible before moving on.
They jump them up, sniff around and then
move on.

As the sun begins to rise, the does will
start to show up first, usually right after first
light. Generally, they are by themselves or
in small family groups with another doe or
two and a few fawns. The bucks usually
don’t start coming through until well after
sunrise. Some mornings they were so late
in arriving that l figured the show was over
before it even started only to see the first
buck about the time l would normally think
about climbing down. In other words, don’t
give up too early—bedding areas can produce
action well into the late morning.
Possibly the best part about hunting
bedding areas at this time of the season
is the sheer number of hours that bucks
are active. lf you’re hunting edges, the
activity slows shortly after sunrise. When
the deer disappear from these places,
where do you think they are heading?
That’s right, toward doe bedding areas.

Deeper in the cover the bucks keep
moving for hours. The majority of the action
occurs during the first four hours of the
morning—actual|y the second, third and
fourth hours. I challenge you to find another
stand location where you can expect three
hours of activity each morning.

I remember hearing a humorous remark
by noted gun writer Craig Boddington. He
said, “Bowhunting is like shopping. Gun
hunting is like buying.” Some mornings the
action in these bedding areas makes
bowhunting seem a lot more like buying, too.
At its best, the morning action is awesome
bordering on unbelievable, like the morning
I spent covered up by more than a dozen
bucks trailing two hot does that passed
right under my stand. The right time? That’s
easy; a cool morning during the rut. The
right place? That’s easy, too; A doe bedding
area is the handsdown pick. <–<<

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Published by RutNStrut2010 on 11 Jan 2011

2011 Archery Trade Show Bow review

I shot all of the bows available to be shot at the 2011 Archery Trade show in Indy. Bows ranking in top 5. #1 Elite Pulse, smooth draw, better than the judge, less hump in valley, same wall as before. #2 Bowtech Invasion… super smooth draw, good speed and no hand shock. #3 Hoyt Carbon Element …smooth draw, descent wall, no hand shock. #4 Athens Afflixtion nice wall, smooth draw, good price. #5 Winchester Quick silver 31, feels better than the 34, nice wall, good speed

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Published by archerchick on 10 Jan 2011

Let Your Eyes Do The Walking ~ By Dwight R. Schuh


Bow & Arrow Magazine
Bowhunter’s Annual 1979

LET YOUR EYES DO THE WALKING ~ BY DWIGHT R. SCHUH
Knowing Where To Look Is The Real Key To Efficient Spotting Of Game.

FROM HIGH ON THE cliff I could see two men hunting slowly across a sagebrush flat. Then the buck appeared between me and the hunters. He moved cautiously toward the head of a shallow canyon where the men would soon cross. Obviously, he had them spotted.

Just beneath a low rim the big four-point stopped and peeked over. For ten minutes or more he stood motionless, watching the hunters approach from a hundred yards away only to pass within thirty yards of his position. Surely his antlers were in their view. But they didn’t notice, and continued past the buck and across the flat.

When the hunters were well beyond, the buck slipped back under the rim, sneaked some distance
away from them. then trotted onto the flat, following the very route the men had just come from. I
couldn’t help but laugh. Mule deer are stupid?

I also had to reflect on this drama. Frequently, I’d hunted this country the way those hunters were
doing, covering as much ground as possible, looking for deer out ahead. I figured the more ground covered the more game seen, and the more game seen, the better the hunting. But this episode impressed on me the folly of that philosophy. How many big bucks had sneaked away from me? And how many times had I seen deer racing away I through the woods or across the sage flats, deer that had seen me before I’d seen them? Many times, that’s for sure. And just as sure, none of those deer had ended up on a meat pole.

A deer that sneaks away or is running full-bore is no game for the bow and arrow. Generally, to get a good shot a bowhunter must see an animal before it sees him, and his best bet for doing that is to stay in one spot and to look.

A moving hunter just sets himself up to be spotted. The less moving and more observing a bowhunter does, the better his chances for seeing unspooked game, an advantage that not only gives him time to plan a good elk but time to size up antlers and body condition as well. It gives him time to size up the overall situation, too, a point I’ve learned the value, of many times. In one
particular instance, I’d watched a dandy three-point buck bed in high sage.

In a hurry to get a shot, I went right after it without looking further. The stalk looked easy, but
about a quarter-mile short of my goal, two forked—horn bucks boiled out of the sage at my feet.,Of course, their snorting and stomping spooked my quarry. With more time
spent observing, I’d have seen them and could have planned
my stalk along a different route.

Finally, an emphasis on eye, rather than leg, power can save a hunter a lot of energy and can make him much more efficient. With his eyes, he can cover more ground more quickly, more quietly and more thoroughly than with his feet, I’ve spent days sneaking and peering over rimrocks, looking for deer bedded at the base of the cliffs. In three seasons of this, not once did I catch a buck there although deer beds were thick. Finally, frustrated, I went to a point overlooking a stretch of cliffs and settled in to watch.

The first day, three bucks walked across the flat above and picked their way down the rim. They bedded in the shadows at the base of a cliff. An hour later, knowing exactly where they were, I walked right to their position and collected a forked horn. I’d~.scored finally, because I’d
found an efficient way of hunting this country. I’d saved myself many more miles of fruitless walking as well.

The same game—spotting principles apply to all hunting situations, whether still-hunting through thick woods, watching from a stand, or spot-and-stalk hunting desert country. The differences are only a matter of degree.

The biggest advantage over game a hunter can give himself is to look for animals that are moving and are in the open. That may seem obvious, but a lot of hunters haven’t caught on.

“Ninety percent of the people who hunt here head out from camp to hunt about 8 or 9 o’clock,
just when they should be calling it quits for the day,” the manager of a bowhunting area told me. “And they’re returning to camp in the afternoon about the time they should be heading out to hunt.”

His point was that they were missing the prime hunting times of the day. Beyond any question, the first hour of daylight in the morning and the last hour in the evening are
the best times for spotting game (with exception of antelope which area active throughout the day).
As an example, during the 1977 season, my wife and I were perched on a desert cliff before daybreak. As the dawn glow slowly lightened a broad sage flat below us, we began to make out deer. By the time the sun came up, we had twenty-eight bucks in plain view. They were scattered all over, moving and feeding. By 8a.m. they’d vanished. A latecomer would have sworn the flat was barren. But we knew better. The bucks had just settled into the high sage for the day.

Another time, one August, we were overlooking a brush patch surrounded by dense oak trees. The parched California foothills looked lifeless. But at 6 p.m. the sun dipped behind a ridge, flooding the brush with shade, and within fifteen minutes, blacktails began slipping from the
oaks. By 6:30, a half-hour before sunset, We could see six large bucks and a number of does, all in the open.

In both cases, we could have blistered our eyes all day, scouring the brush for deer. Most likely we’d have seen none. But during the prime times, early and late, the deer were as easy to see as cows grazing a grassy hillside.

Certain weather can give the same advantage that early and late daytime periods can, because under some conditions, deer and elk may feed all day, making them easy to spot. Although game animals normally seek shelter during windy, violent storms, they’ll often be active and feeding preceding and following such storms. And on heavily overcast, drizzly days I’ve had excellent success spotting both deer and elk throughout the day. In fact, I’ve taken two elk that were feeding in the open during midday downpours.

Some hunters believe they have an advantage during breeding seasons because animals in rut supposedly for stupid things, but I don’t agree. Bucks or bull elk may indeed be less cautious at this time, but the real advantage is the fact that, rather than bedding all day, these animals
are active and moving, often in the open, making them much easier to spot than under normal conditions. In most regions, deer rut in November and December, elk in September. If seasons in your area are in progress at these times, take advantage of them.

In some cases, the later the season the better the game-spotting conditions. In western Oregon, for example, the early bow season is in September, the late season in November. In September, jungle—like foliage limits visibility to a few yards, but by the late season, leaves have fallen. A
hunter can see farther into the brush and actually can spot deer moving on adjacent hillsides, an impossibility earlier.

Snow is another advantage in late-season hunting. Not only are animals often more concentrated by snow but they’re the most visible against a white background.
Dan Eastmen, an Oregon biologist who’s spent years surveying deer, told me he felt knowing where to look was the real key to “efficient” spotting. His point was that a person can’t go into the field with wide-angle vision, looking at any and everywhere and expect to see much game. He has to concentrate his looking on habitat roost likely to hold animals.

Foe example, deer may use different slopes under various conditions. During dry season and hot weather, they’ll concentrate on north and east facing slopes where moisture lasts longest.

This is particularly true in dry country. When I first hunted desert mule deer, I spend days looking for bucks and nearly dropped my teeth every time I saw one, the occurance was so rare. Then Dan Herrig, a wildlife biologist who’d spent months observing desert bucks, set me straight.

“In this country during the Summer, I spend my time watching north slopes.” Herrig said ” A north exposure holds moisture longest and It’s shaded and cool. I look under trees, and in the shade at the bases of bushes and rocks. That’s where the bucks will bed.

Taking Herrig’s advice, I began seeing more deer than I’d dreamed existed. Up until then I’d been looking everywhere, and probably ninety percent of the country I looked at held no deer at all. Of course the preferred slope depends on the weather and season. During a cold spell, deer may move to a warm south or west facing slope. Picking the right are is a matter of judgement. Herrig offered another bit of advice that has paid off for me.
“Deer have traditional bedding areas.” he said “They’ll come back to the same places year after year.”

Under several juniper trees in a steep canyon he pointed out deer beds that had been worn two and three-feet deep from constant use by deer. Such beds. are especially common in steep, rocky terrain where bedding sites area at a premium. A hunter who knows the location of these traditional areas can expect to observe deer there consistently.

Food and cover are, of course, are major influences on game distribution. Vegetation and terrain that supply these basics will vary considerably from one region to another, but the principle is the same everywhere. For example around extensive new clearcuts or in open desert or grassland, areas with plenty of feed animals may congregate near pockets of good cover. In forested wilderness, on the other hand, climax vegetation generally guarantees a surplus of cover, but forage often is scarce. Here a hunter should locate and concentrate spotting efforts on areas where game animals will feed.

Prehunt reconnaissance of an area is a good idea, but not only to look for sign verifying the presence of game, but also to plan your hunt. In open country find cliffs, hilltops or other observation points that overlook feeding or bedding areas. In denser country, pick places for stands near clearings or well-used trails where visibility is good, or outline still-hunting routes from which you can observe promising habitat.

Keep two things in mind as you plan. First evaluate prevailing wind direction. If you try to observe country from the upwind side, animals will vacate before you ever see them.

Second, consider the sun. In dense canyon bottom this may not be a concern, but in open country, it’s vital. Without reservation I say never hunt or glass toward the sun. With that bright light in your face, you can see next to nothing. In the morning glass or still hunt from east to west and vice versa in the afternoon. Have alternate observation points and hunting routes in mind to make this possible and to compensate for changing winds.

The one essential equipment item for all game spotting is binoculars. Nobody can hunt as efficiently, under any conditions, with bare eyes as he can with binoculars.

That’s because binoculars not only magnify detail, but at close range, the isolate it. The, closer you focus, the shallower the depth-of-field, so that only objects in the plane of focus are sharp. If you’re focused for thirty yards an antler tine at that distance will stand out strikingly from
that blurred brush in front and behind. Binoculars also gather light, a real advantage early and late and on dark days.

During serious hunting, you’ll use binoculars constantly, probably several hours a day, so they have to be handy. To mak sure mine are, I have put an elastic band on them. , I hang the glasses around my neck then slip the elastic around my chest. The elastic band holds the glasses snug
against my body, but it stretches enough to allow bringing
them to my eyes.

Cheap binoculars are a waste of money. They’re often poorly aligned and
will make you cross eyed and dizzy. Good glasses start at about $100.

In open country 8x or 10x binoculars are good, but for all-around use, 6X or 7X are probably better. I’ve been more than satisfied with my Bausch & Lomb 7X35s.

A spotting scope is invaluable in open country where visibility is great. For the money, l think a fixed-power scope of 15X or 20X is the best buy. Variable power, say
15x-60x is fine under ideal conditions, but often, heatwaves cause such distortion that magnification over about 25x is useless.

High-power, optical equipment must be held solid. Binoculars of 7X, for example, magnify every movement you make by seven times. You won’t see much more than blurry scenery if you’re standing, holding binoculars with one hand. Use a tripod. or sit down, wrap your hands around your glasses, rest your elbows on your knees, and brace your hands against your forehead to form a solid glassing position. With a spotting scope, use a tripod.

To glass efficiently, be systematic. Whether you`re inspecting a brush patch at thirty yards or an open canyon face a mile away. divide the area into sections and cover it thoroughly from one side to the other.

l use two approaches to game spotting. One is to glass once, slowly and meticulously. from one side of an area to the other, trying to make out every detail the first time though. The other approach is to cover the country rapidly, going over it several times. Generally, the second
approach works better for me. My thinking is that if animals are in cover, I probably won’t see them, no matter how long I stare at one place. But if I’m hunting during a prime time when animals are active and moving, they’ll sooner or later work into a position where they can be seen easily. Even if I overlook animals the first, second or third times, I’ll eventually spot them if I cover an area enough times. Besides, rapid glassing seems to cause less eye strain than staring for a long period at one spot.

Game spotting takes time. A quick once-over won’t do. If l`m observing open country where visibility may be a mile or more, I glass for two or three hours from one position. In dense forest, of course, where visibility is thirty yardis, nobody is going to stay in one place for three hours.
There, a few minutes from each position may be long enough. Probably more important in dense country than absolute time is the ratio of time spent moving to
observing. A moving hunter won’t see nearly as much as
one who’s motionless, and he’s much more likely to be
spotted himself. Most good still—hunters agree that they
spend no more than a quarter of their time moving. They
spend the other three-quarters stationary, studying the
brush ahead.
The old cliche about “practice makes perfect” definitely
applies to game spotting. During my first years of big-game
hunting, I felt blind. My companions always spotted deer
before I did. But with experience, I’ve learned to make out
detail, and now the sight of a deer’s leg, an antler tine or a
flicking ear catches my eye immediately. My vision is no
better. Practice simply has put meaning into these details.
Practice is the only way to develop spotting skill.
And this skill is at the heart of productive hunting.
Whatever your circumstances, you’ll have little success
hunting with the bow and arrow if you can’t spot game
animals before they spot you. And rarely will you if you’re
hunting by leg power alone. If you’ve found yourself leaving
lots of tracks across the landscape but seeing less
than your share of game, get smart. Sit down, get out your
binoculars and let your eyes do the walking. <—·<<<<

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