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Published by Lady Artemis on 18 Sep 2011

TALL BOY

Northern Indiana

10/18/2008:

My husband and I were out in our ladder stand overlooking a freshly-cut bean field.  We had taken our video camera with us for the first time.  Just a few minutes before dark, two bucks came out to feed;  one small fork horn and a larger tall-racked one.  The bigger buck spent some time working a scrape and licking branch at the field edge.  We captured about 15 minutes of video before the light faded.

One of the deer was just a stone’s throw away as we carefully climbed down in the dark.  Neither deer spooked when we left, but it made for a nervous trip out knowing they were behind us on the same trail.  Returning home, we watched the video footage we just shot, and wondered if we would see the big buck a.k.a. “Tall Boy” ever again.

10/19/2008:

The next day, I decided on the spur of the moment to hunt our stand again.  My husband was staying home to watch the F1 race, and he thought I could go out hunting for a few hours alone.  The weather was fore-casted to be mild;  50 degrees, light wind and no rain.    By the time I did my normal prep, it was around 3 o’clock before I arrived on stand.  I saw an occasional squirrel or flock of songbirds, but no deer showed up for about 3 hours.

A little after 6 pm, a mature doe and yearling stepped out on the other side of the field.  They fed for a few minutes, then the doe suddenly stared right at me, blowing and stomping her foot.   She pranced around the field and carried on for several minutes, but would not leave.  I froze in the stand, afraid to move or even make eye contact.

Another yearling and a fork horn buck came out into the field.  The little buck immediately began dogging the doe.  The entire group started trotting around the field, doing their best to avoid the young buck.  One by one, all the deer disappeared as the buck chased them into the trees.

With the field now empty and believing I was probably done after the alarm the doe had sounded, I hung up my bow and considered leaving soon.  I slowly let out a deep breath and tried to ease the tension between my shoulders.  Moments later, I glanced over my left shoulder and saw another small buck along with two does.  A few minutes passed, then the small buck looked back at the trees as a big buck stepped out.

Not believing my eyes, I blinked several times to clear my vision and used my binoculars to look at the deer more closely.  Tall Boy had returned!  I again grabbed my bow and quietly waited while the deer slowly worked towards me.  Another doe came out to join the group.  Soon, the whole herd was coming near me to feed on some tender new grass under my stand.  The four other deer were within 20 yards and facing me.  I knew I would have to shoot sitting down with so many deer so close.

Tall Boy walked to within 15 yards and stopped perfectly broadside.  I waited for his front leg to go forward to make for a higher-percentage shot.   I leaned forward, canting and drawing the bow at the same time.   My only opening was thru a large fork in the tree.  In the instant I came to full draw, the deer lifted his head and looked right at me.  Afraid he would jump the string, I aimed low on his chest and released the arrow.

All the deer scattered, running in opposite directions across the bean field.   By the time the others had disappeared, my deer was lagging behind.   He slowed to a walk, then stopped next to the scrape he had worked the day before.   He staggered, then tipped over sideways, disappearing into the trees.   I heard a loud crash, then the woods became completely silent.

It was now about 7:15 pm and I knew that darkness was coming within minutes.   I quickly gathered my gear and climbed out of the tree.   I walked softly over to the last place I had seen the deer and peeked into the woods.   Just 10 feet into the tree line, I saw the white belly and horns of my deer.   He had only ran about 75 yards from where I had shot him.   I went to him and saw that he was not getting up.    My single shot had been all that was necessary.   I laid my hands upon his rack and said a prayer of thanks for this precious gift.

I called my husband with the news and asked for his help recovering the deer.  When he arrived, we discovered the joy of field dressing by headlight and flashlight, not the optimal conditions for sure.  We checked him in the next day, and found his weight to be 180# dressed.


After 7 long years of waiting, with many close encounters and missed opportunities, I have finally harvested my first deer.  He was everything I had ever wanted, truly a deer of my dreams.

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Published by Double s on 09 Sep 2011

Tough Buck Falls

I took this fella around 4 pm on the 2nd in a CRP field. I call him “Tough Buck”. He was bedded down in some sage. I had the wind to my advantage as I made my way to him…slowly. When the wind died down…I stopped…When the wind picked up…I moved. I basically crab walked sideways making sure that I was in Shooting position just in case he heard me and got up. I got to 21 yards and stopped. I had one sage blocking his view of me. I must have ranged the bush he was beside 100 times. I got into shooters position and Yelped at him. I saw his Antlers move left then right…then he got up. I place my 20 yard pin on the right front armpit and fired. I couldn’t even hear the impact because of the wind. He bucked up once and dropped to his front knee’s. I figured this is it….Nope!. He gets back up and trots off away 40 yards and beds down under another sage. It felt like a great shot but I started to second guess myself. I waited about 20 minutes glassing him. I thought he had expired but he picked his head up again, I knew he was wounded bad. With the high heat I couldn’t back out and come back later, the meat would spoil plus i didn’t want him to suffer any more. I slowly made my way toward him again using the same tactics. I got into 20 yards of him again and got into my shooters position. I had a west to east wind and it was picking up. I yelped to him and nothing happened…I yelped again, His antlers moved…He was weak. I finally just yelled. He slowly gets up and I aimed for the same right front armpit again. Fired. I see the impact and the blood blow out. He turns around facing east to try to go uphill to get away from me.,he didn’t make it. He made it about 25 yards east and rolled. I could see all four hoofs up in the air in the sage. A couple of jerks of the hoofs and he expired. My son Arrived as well as a friend to help out. I gutted him out and we used a tarp to drag him out. After I got him skinned out I could see two puncture holes on the right side, the entrance, almost touching. I call him a “Tough Buck”.

He has 6 points on the left side but the eye guard is under the 1 inch rule. So I’m calling it 5.
The right is 4 plus 1 eye guard way over the 1 inch rule. That’s a 5.


Two entrance holes from 2 blade BH. Right side right above the armpit. I have him hanging head down with head already removed.

left side of the pass through

 

Preping for skinning and boiling

Muley Skull almost complete

 

 

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Published by gmoore on 02 Sep 2011

Distance Estimation and Arrow Fall

Arrow FallDistance estimation is important for archers. Without an exact estimate of the range, a hunter could shoot from the improper sight pin and entirely miss the target. Making use of a bow mounted rangefinder removes the estimation of distance, and will provide a hunter more success.

Even unskilled bow hunters know that arrow fall is impacted more as the distance of the shot increases. Modern compound bows are especially fast, and often experience a small amount of arrow drop at ranges within 20 yards.

An arrow will begin to drop at a greater pace at a distance of 30 to 40 yards. This is due to the effect of gravity and a decrease in arrow speed. A poor gauge at distance will limit the chances for success. If you make a poor estimation of the range of a 40 yard shooting opportunity by as little as 5 yards, it can result in an injured deer, or a complete miss. Estimating distance precisely is by far the most significant variable for success in the field.

It is recommended that a bowhunter be aware of what their bow is capable of and be aware of the degree of arrow drop experienced at different distances. Hunting bows are frequently equipped with sights that make use of a few fiber optic sight pins of various colors. Each of these pins are generally sighted in at 10 yard increments from 20 to 50 yards.

Once your bow sights are properly adjusted, you can do a simple test to see how you may miss your shot if you misjudge the range. Lay a paper plate on your target. This is approximately the dimensions of the vital area of an average whitetail deer. Step off or range your target to a distance of 40 yards. Then draw your bow and place your 30 yard pin right in the middle of that paper plate. With your 30 yard pin in the center of the target, examine where that 40 yard pin falls on the target. You will most likely see that your arrow will land short and miss the vital area of the deer. You will probably end up missing the shot, or possibly wounding the deer.

I’ve never attempted a shot on a deer inside 25 yards, and not delivered a fatal shot. There have been a number of missed shots and a few bad shots that only injured my game. Those shooting opportunities were typically at distances near 30 yards or greater. At a range of of 30 to 40 yards, I was never completely confident. It was rare for me to take a shot past 40 yards. It is tough to regain that confidence in the deer stand. There is a big difference between shooting at the archery range at pre-defined distances, and shooting from the treestand with approximated distances. Small miscalculations in range from the deer stand yielded missed shots and diminished confidence.

Making use of a little, hand-held laser rangefinder helped to bring back a lot of the confidence that I had lost. Deer would mostly be on the move as I ranged them though. So there was still some uncertainty by the time I could draw my bow and accurately shoot my arrow.

There are some high tech and low tech products that can correct the issues with distance approximation. The Leupold Vendetta is an electronic bow mounted range finder, and the Dead-on rangefinder is a non-electronic model. So you can easily determine the range to a deer a split second before actually taking your shot, and know that you are selecting the proper sight pin.

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Published by Kevo on 29 Aug 2011

Hogbash Hog Hunting Competition

Wanted to post a link on a statewide hog hunting competition, starting in October and running through opening weekend of rifle season, day or night.  Rifle division and archery division, gonna be lots of fun some great prizes.  Awards ceremony with some awesome door prizes and live band afterwards.  Check it out at www.hornstarsoutdoors.com/hogbash

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Published by dandu005 on 29 Aug 2011

Old School Dilemma

For the last couple of years, I have been fighting a battle within that won’t settle. It isn’t so much a battle of is an act right or wrong, but whether to change and try something new. I know I am not the only one out there that doesn’t like change, so I am sure you guys know my struggle. The struggle I speak of is the switch back to traditional shooting equipment.

Currently I shoot a Mathews Reezen complete with all of the bells and whistles. I have wanted to get into shooting traditional recurve more, yet I feel that it would be bad to try to shoot both bows at the same time, splitting practice time between the two bows. It seems to be not as efficient as focusing on one method. However, I can’t get myself to make the full switch to shooting a recurve and leave the Mathews behind. Traditional archery is growing more and more popular  as each year passes, so that also puts pressure on me to pick it up and go. I already shoot a recurve around compound practice time and am proficient enough to hunt with it. Although is it wise to switch back and forth between bows during bow season and tournament seasons? I may be exaggerating any concerns about shooting both and it may be no problem at all.

Comments are desired to help not only me, but any others who may be contemplating picking up traditional archery.

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Published by admin on 29 Aug 2011

Straight Shot
with frank addington, jr.


The Aspirin Buster tour rolls on..

A variety of shows and events have made summer 2011 a busy time for me. I hope that you have enjoyed your summer. As we all anxiously await fall for obvious reasons, college football and hunting season, I took a few minutes to reflect on recent shows and events. Summer 2011 has had lots of great events…

July 15-17 I was in Alabama for the 28th Annual World Deer Expo in Birmingham, Alabama. This is one of the largest shows of it’s type in the country and I enjoyed a return visit to this venue. Bob Coker and I did some media Friday morning early, including a visit to a local Birmingham radio show. Here’s video footage of that media appearance, visit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7dc1BMeUlFM We also did a TV news appearance while at this venue. Bob runs a great show and if you are an exhibitor this is a good opportunity to see lots of folks in one weekend, he gets a great crowd at this event.

July 28-30 I was in Coudersport, PA to perform shows at “Denton Hill” or ETAR, the Eastern Traditional Archery Rendezvous. This is dubbed one of the largest traditional archery events in the country and people come from far and wide to this event. Held at a ski resort, there are archery ranges, vendors in tents, practice ranges, the famous blanket sell where people lay items on blankets each evening to sale or trade, and lots of other fun activities. I don’t often do many “archery only” events like this so it was nice to spend a weekend among traditional archers. I met some new friends, saw some old friends, and had a great weekend. Saturday night’s 8PM show was my favorite. A little boy asked to shoot 20 arrows at once. Although I only had 12, I loaded all 12 on the string and popped a balloon with them. This was a new shot and the audience liked it so much that I have done it several times at shows since. The grand finale that night was a mustard seed. I had four spotters come up from the audience, put a black background on my net so we could all see the seed, and Jake Chapman tossed the seed into mid air. I hit it first shot! I dedicated the shot to my friend the late Rev. Stacy Groscup, who often performed at Denton Hills.

August 5-6 was the big DEERASSIC CLASSIC event in Cambridge, Ohio. This is the event that draws 15,000 plus people. I performed twice on Saturday, once in the afternoon and the grand finale was Saturday evening at 7:20PM, just before the big fifty fifty drawing took place and then country singer Josh Thompson performed. As I walked out on stage Saturday night, it looked like a sea of people. They video the show and broadcast it on the grounds with jumbotron screens. After hitting the three baby aspirin tablets, I announced to the crowd that we were gonna attempt the mustard seed shot. Conner put up a dark background on the net and did a practice throw. His next toss went up and again, FIRST SHOT! That was a great way to close the show. This is a one of a kind event that I often have heard called the “Woodstock of hunting.”

August 20-21 I joined my friend Bud at the Wheeling, West Virginia Cabela’s for a weekend of exhibitions there. I did two Saturday and two Sunday. This show was challenging weathewise, Saturday we had extreme heat and sunshine and then Sunday had high winds. We moved the show under the main entrance and had some great audiences over the four performances. I hit the mustard seed at every show, and this is getting to be a popular shot. I did two radio interviews, Chris Lawrence mentioned the show being at Cabelas on his statewide “WV Outdoors” show, and a TV news station captured the mustard seed shot on camera while I was in town. Cabela’s fed me well and I had a great time at this event. This is their third largest footprint in all the Cabela’s, at 175,000′ ft. They also have a million ‘ ft. distribution center nearby so Cabela’s has had a big impact on the economy in Wheeling, WV.

August 27-28 I will be performing at Festival in the Pines in Eau Claire, WI. I have performed in Eau Claire many times at the Northern Wisconsin Deer Classic but have not performed in Eau Claire in the summer. I am looking forward to this event. After that I head back to Nebraska for more shows and then on to other places for appearances through November. I’ll take December off to be home for the holidays before the January season kicks off another year of shows. So it goes in the life of a traveling archery showman. We are currently working on the Winter 2012 schedule and will try and post some dates/locations soon. I am looking forward to working with the Renfro family again in Indianapolis in 2012, they have a great show and I always enjoy performing there.

I’ve now added the 12 arrow shot and the mustard seed shot to our programs in most places. So far the audiences love the new shots. They are both challenging but then again so is a baby aspirin from behind the back, right? That’s the latest on the “HAVE BOW WILL TRAVEL” tour. Visit www.frankaddingtonjr.com for more information on my show. You can video footage on page 2 of the website.

Seeing is believing, see you at the show!

Until next time, Adios and God Bless.

Shoot Straight,
Frank Addington, Jr.
The Aspirinbuster

Photo is on stage at the 2011 DEERASSIC CLASSIC event.

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Published by dandu005 on 29 Aug 2011

Hunting Rig Tuned/Ready to Roll for 2011

After a month of headache and frustration, I have gotten the kinks out of my Mathews Reezen and it is in top functioning condition. This endeavor took so long after having to replace the cam, string and buss cable. Now we are ready, the ripcord arrow rest, the apex 6-pin sight, Goldtip Ted Nugent arrows and rage 2-blades. I am really excited about the final set-up, and with many nice bucks on camera, it is looking good that I will get a chance to score with my backstrap whackin’ machine. I can’t let it go unrecognized however, that this was all done with great help from the AT forum, Nuts and Bolts tuning guide, and Peterson’s Bowhunting site and their field editor videos and tech talks.

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Published by archerchick on 29 Jul 2011

The “REEL” Robin Hood & The Real Robin Hood ~ By David Barnett

The “REEL” Robin Hood & The Real Robin Hood
By David Barnett

Perhaps the greatest shot in cinematic
history was not fired in Stagecoach
or High Noon, but rather by a mysterious archer in a romantic 1938 Warner
Brothers movie called The Adventures of Robin Hood.

The shot is best remembered by archery
fans for the dramatic impact of splitting an
arrow already firmly centered in a bull’s eye.
The colorful scene appeared in the ever popular
and legendary film which is still viewed on
television, and is presently celebrating its
golden anniversary. It is likely that no picture
in movie history has done more to popularize
archery than The Adventures of Robin Hood.

Errol Flynn starred as the dashing Saxon
outlaw and swashbuckling advocate of social
justice and human rights. Robin Hood was undoubtedly
one of the most splendidly photographed and visually exciting films of the late
1930s. The New Republic wrote that “the production is done expensively and in all colors
the rainbow forgot?

Filmed in eye-dazzling technicolor, the
movie had Errol Flynn romancing the lovely
Maid Marian (Olivia DeHavilland) and battling
Norman treachery and black villainy,
personified by Prince John (Claude Rains)
and Guy of Gisbourne (Basil Rathbone).
Newsweek noted, “Taken in the spirit in
which it was intended, this colorful pageant of
fairy tale twelfth century is a grand film .”

Appealing to moviegoers of all ages, The
Adventures of Robin Hood covered the Saxon
hero of folklore from nock to tip. The movie is
set in that period of English history when
Prince John usurped the crown of his brother,
Richard the Lion hearted, who was abroad in
the Holy Land. Prince John and his henchmen
ruthlessly taxed the Saxons and the poor of the
realm, adding tothe already fat purses of the
Normans. Incensed by the excessive taxation,
and by the law decreeing that the poor cannot
hunt deer in the royal forests, Robin Hood organizes
a band of green-clad, hearty eating
Merry Men to fight the oppression until Richard
returns from the crusades to reclaim the
throne.

The Adventures of Robin Hood was a beautiful blend of romance and flair. The film was
replete with ambushes in a pristine-looking Sherwood Forest, deadly swordplay in
Nottingham Castle, mighty hand-to-hand fights, a pole fight on a log and a daring rescue from
the gallows. The high point of the picture, and the scene that is best remembered by movie-
goers, however, involved an archery tournament.

Tournament A Trap
Angered by their inability to capture
Robin Hood on his own turf, Prince John and
the sinister Guy of Gisbourne devise a scheme
to lure Robin Hood out of Sherwood Forest.
The plan calls for an archery pageant to be
held to determine who is the greatest archer in
the land. The winnerwill be awarded a golden
arrow by none other than Maid Marian. Since
the conspirators know that Robin Hood is secretly
wooing Marian, they are sure he will
appear and they are positive that they can capture him.

The best archers of the realm all assemble
on the plains outside Nottingham, including
Robin Hood in disguise. Through a process of
elimination involving target shooting, all but
two archers are eliminated — King John’s best
and Robin Hood. King John’s archer shoots
first. He draws his longbow, aims and fires.
His arrow is true and hits the center of the
bull’s eye. Tension builds. Robin Hood steps
up to his mark, draws his bow, aims and fires.
The scene has since become a part of movie
folklore and the name Errol Flynn has often
been thought synonymous for “archer” in
popular culture.

When Robin Hood was originally released, critics
of the period took immediate
notice of the archery pageant. said,
“Some hundreds of extra players are engaged
in several of the scenes, notably the archery
tournament. . .” Commonwealth wrote that
Flynn had the “swashbuckling flair for shooting
a mean arrow. . He also related that the
film was a “bow twanging tecchnicolor” saga
in which Robin Hood “betters Prince John’s
best in archery. . .”

Although there isn’t any doubt that the arrow-splitting
scene was the dramatic point of
the film, archery enthusiasts who have seen
the picture will recall that there are numerous
other scenes which are replete with ferociously
flying arrows and trick shots.

Wanted: Expert Archer
When the head honchos at Warner Brothers reviewed the screenplay of The Adventures
0f Robin Hood, they were quick to take notice of the many scenes which would require
extremely skillful trick archery. Fearful that Flynn and the other stars of the movie would
end up killing themselves or somebody else with arrows if they were actually allowed to
do the archery scenes, the studio decided to hire an expert archer to do all the shooting.

With the tacit support of the National
Archery Association (but largely through the
notorious Hollywood grapevine), the director,
William Keighley, eventually assembled
the 50 best archers in America at the Warner
Brothers studio in Burbank, California.
Keighley held a tournament (not unlike that
seen in Robin Hood) to decide who could be
entrusted with the lives of his cast and crew.
The 50 archers held a shoot-off until the number
was reduced to five. Keighley then handed
each archer six arrows and told them to fire as
rapidly as possible at a faraway target. One
archer named Howard Hill not only took the
six arrows that Keighley handed him, but
grabbed seven more from the director for a
total of 13. Hill quickly lined up all 13 arrows
on his bow and fired them simultaneously at
the target. Of the 13 arrows, nine hit the bull ’s
eye and the other four hit sevens. Amazed,
Keighley immediately hired Hill and jokingly
told him that, while Errol Flynn was the
“reel” Robin Hood, Hill was truly the “real”
Robin Hood.

At the time that The Adventures of Robin
Hood was produced, Howard Hill had acquired
the reputation of America’s greatest
trick archer. In The Complete Book 0f the Bow
and Arrow, G. Howard Gillelan noted, “During
the depression, the great Howard Hill
made movie shorts of his extraordinary feats
with the bow.”

Hill had won numerous national archery
tournaments and was known to hunt shark,
crocodile and bear with his bow and arrow.
He also gave many archery exhibitions in
which he would shoot a cigarette from the
mouth of a courageous cohort. He even, like
William Tell, shot an apple off the head of a
dauntless subject. Hill did both the
aforementioned tricks at 60 paces.

“big five” with the 115-pound longbow,
“Grandma,” on display in the museum.
Press clippings from the era identify Hill
as “the most widely known big game hunter.”
His friendship with stars like Flynn, DeHaviland,
Rory Calhoun and Basil Rathbone only
added to his fame, and when Hill taught his
Hollywood friends to bowhunt, it was great
publicity for the sport.

Tens of thousands of people saw Hill in
person at shooting exhibitions he put on coast
to coast; millions more learned about archery
and bowhunting in the 23 short subjects Hill
filmed to run before features in movie houses
of the era.

Visitors examining “White Eagle,” the 85-pound longbow Howard Hill used in
exhibitions, would probably be surprised at the visible imperfections. Handmade, the equipment
lacks the uniformity today’s consumers have come to expect from mass-produced
merchandise. “Howard built this bow for himself, not for the public ,” his nephew explains,
and he shot every bow he owned enough to know exactly how it would perform.

As a young man, Jerry Hill remembers pointing out some flaws in a bow built for
himself. “His advice to me was to ‘quit looking for boogers and go shoot the hell out of
it.”’

When William Keighley mentioned the arrow-splitting scene to his newly hired archer,
Hill said that shooting at a stationary target was simple and that he would have no
difficulty with the shot, In the scene, Hill actually doubled for Flynn. From 100 paces, Hill fired
at the target and split the arrow in one take. The flight of the arrow is not seen, however,
because of the inability of the camera equipment of the time to track the path of the arrow.

Instead, the camera shows Hill (Robin Hood) and then quickly cuts to the splitting of the
arrow. To this day, the rare arrow in a target that splits another is referred to as a “Robin
Hood .”

Winning Their Trust
Hill was such an amazing trick shooter that he quickly won the confidence
of the entire cast. In another scene, for example, he is called upon to shoot a steel mace out of the
hand of Basil Rathbone. The director called for a stunt double, but Rathbone refused, stating that
he had complete confidence in Hill ’s excellent archery skills. Hill also did that
scene in one take.

In total, Howard Hill was called upon to perform 11 trick shots in Robin Hood. Of the
11 shots, however, he only did the previously mentioned two in one take. The other nine
shots had to be done in a number of takes, largely because Hill was required to shoot
more than one arrow at a time, in rapid succession, and hit precise targets through
moving crowds. The exact timing of the shots was imperative because many lives were at stake.

In the August 8, 1938 , edition of Collier Ls, Howard Hill claimed that his toughest shot in
the movie was shooting a man off a rapidly moving horse. “‘The target I had to hit,” Hill
said, “was moving up and down and coming forward at a terrific speed —— all at one time! ”
For the 21 weeks that Hill worked on The Adventures of Robin Hood he was paid $150
per week, plus $100 for every trick shot. In between scenes, he also taught archery
to Errol Flynn. “Errol Flynn learned archery so fast that he even went
out and bagged a bobcat,” Hill related.

What influence did the movie, Errol Flynn’s acting ability and Hill’s archery expertise
have on the growth and popularization of archery as a sport in the United States? The
exact influence, of course, is impossible to calculate. It can be ascertained, however, that
a year or so after the movie was released, the National Field Archery Association
was organized. Also, in the early 1940s, a number of states passed laws legalizing bow and arrow
hunting, thus opening a new phase for archery.

It should also be noted that between the time the NAA held its national tournament in
Los Angeles in 1934 and the end of World War II, the estimated number of bow-twangers in
the United States grew by more than 1.7 million people. Surely, The Adventures of Robin
Hood must have been a factor in this explosive growth.

Consequently, in 1988, as The Adventures of Robin Hood celebrates its 50th anniversary,
a golden arrow should be awarded to the picture for being not only an excellent film, but
also for being the greatest archery movie in cinematic history. As Robert E. Morsberger
wrote in Magill Ks Survey of Cinema, “Of all the films of 1938, “The Adventures of Robin
Hood’ is the most enduring. . .”

ARCHIVED BY
www.ARCHERYTALK.com
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Published by KurtD on 18 Jul 2011

It’s All About The Memories By: Ted Nugent

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE MEMORIES
By: Ted Nugent

Growing up in the new musical whirlwind of Chuck Berry, Bo Diddly, Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis and the thrilling new bowhunting world of Fred Bear was very, very exciting. Inspired by these masters of rock-n-roll, I attacked my guitar and musical dreams with a passion fire the likes of which I had no control over. And as far as the mystical flight of the arrow went, I was long gone, addicted, hooked, in love L-U-V, bow and arrow crazy.

Driven by the love and discipline of my incredible parents, I practiced my guitar with a vengeance and shot my bow and arrows every day. I literally could not get enough of either of these passions, and pursued them with every ounce of my being. It was a fascinating, wonderful way to grow up in America, and my memory bank bursts at the seams with glowing, powerful images of family joy and happiness with guitars, guns, bows and arrows.

But as jam packed as my memory bank is, unfortunately the family photo album is a little sparse on snapshots from the old Brownie automatic camera. We have a few dazzling photos of our wonderful family doing all sorts of fun stuff in those early years of the 1950s and early 60s, but I sure wish we had taken the time to take more photos.

As I think back to those annual excursions Up North for opening day of bow season in October, my mind reels with graphic details of the gas stations with bows and arrows and guns and ammo on display. The firestorm of colors in those Michigan hardwoods is as if they are silkscreened on my soul.

I can see my hero Fred Bear sitting next to me at the counter of the Grayling restaurant eating our cherry pie and sipping big glasses of milk together.

How I wish we had captured those incredible memories on film.

We don’t have photos of us catching little blue gills at the woodland lake. No photos of the little log cabin on the beautiful Titabawasee River, gathering wood, hauling water, frying bacon, roasting marshmallows, shooting our bows and .22 rifles.

There are no photos of my first squirrel, my fist deer, my first rabbit.

I would have never imagined I would grow up to be a professional outdoor writer or New York Times Best Selling author, much less the American rock-n-roll guitar guy. No one could have ever guessed I would dedicate my life to promoting our honorable hunting heritage and Second Amendment rights. Photos of my early years living that life sure would have come in mighty handy for such a career.

And even if such a career had never taken shape, I would really love to be able to show my kids and grandkids photos of the old man in action as a little boy who cherished my outdoor lifestyle from the very beginning.

So here’s to everyone out there who loves the great outdoors and thrills at taking our kids, grandkids, family and friends hunting, fishing, trapping, shooting, camping, boating and exploring.

Do yourself a favor and always bring along a decent camera with plenty of spare batteries and memory cards. Take that extra time to stop and document what I believe to be the most cherished lifetime memories of all; families having fun living the outdoor lifestyle.

Capture those life forming moments when we are celebrating the outdoor life we all so love. Get a photo of the young boys and girls with their first fish, their first bulls-eye, a first burnt marshmallow or a hot dog on a stick over an open campfire. Document those glowing smiles, not just for the happy, forever memories, but also to share with other friends, neighbors and classmate just how much fun all these great outdoor activities are for everyone fortunate enough to live them.

By sharing such photos with others, I am convinced the joys will be contagious and a darn good tool for luring more and more families into the shooting sports, and we can all agree just how great that always is.

You and your entire family will be happy you did.

Guns; check. Ammo; check. Bows and arrows; check. Tent; check. Stools; check. Canoe; Check. Fishing poles; Check. Tacklebox; Check. Bait; Check. Camera and batteries; Check. Happy

 

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Published by KurtD on 14 Jul 2011

It’s All About The Little Things by Ted Nugent

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE LITTLE THINGS

by Ted Nugent

My eyes nearly bulged out of my hairy little head. Dear Lord in heaven, there were beautiful big game animals seemingly everywhere. A quartet of stunning spotted axis stags stood a hundred yards yonder, standing there looking at us. Six or seven darn nice whitetails were just beyond them, casually filtering in and out of the bushy scrub. We hadn’t driven a hundred yards when a gorgeous white horned sika stag stuck his head out of a cedar thicket twenty yards off the trail. In a short thirty minute drive, I had seen more amazing big game animals than I would normally see in an entire season on average when I first started hunting. And many of these critters seemed to be so relaxed, I was aghast that it couldn’t possibly be for real.

For a guy who started bowhunting back in the 1950s, I struggled to process the information that had just smacked me between the frontal lobes. It was one of my first adventures in the wilds of the amazing Texas’ Hill Country, and I was about to implode with excitement as I was being led to my afternoon treestand.

The vast open range of this private hunting ranch was loaded with more than twenty five species of indigenous and exotic big game animals, and they were apparently in abundant numbers. Only a few bowhunters had ever hunted this place, and I was invited to sample their hunting to offer my advice on how to set it up for optimal bowhunting.

The pickup chugged up a bumpy, rocky two track road and pulled to a halt where an endless ridge of thick cedars broke off into a desert flat of prickly pear cactus and barren rocky ground. My guide pointed to a lone mesquite tree with a metal tripod wedged into the branches, and told me this was the hot spot for aoudad rams, axis deer, sika, fallow and whitetail galore. He said the feeder was to the north a short ways and would go off around sunset and I should be covered up with critters.

I am telling you, I was more excited than I think I had ever been. I said thank you and hustled over to the tripod as my guide motored off.

When I got to the stand, I became somewhat concerned, for the old tripod was nearly rusted out, and I was actually scared as I climbed aboard the squeaky, swaying, dangerously unstable stand. With no tow rope, I clung to my bow as every step created all kinds of racket, and it got even worse when I settled into the cracked, chipped noisy seat.

I didn’t feel comfortable at all and was actually spooked that I wouldn’t be able to remain steady when attempting to draw back my bow. But I needn’t had worried, for I was completely skylighted eight feet off the ground, with the sun blazing on my face, making my whole body glow against the shiny blue sky. No way would any animal not see me up here.

Next thing I immediately noticed was that the steady breeze was blowing straight for the feeder, which was not a short ways away, but rather a good forty five yards away. Under the feeder was a deep depression, void of any vegetation within fifteen yards.

I furrowed my brow, squinted my sunburned eyeballs and wondered how in the hell anyone with the most minimal basic of hunting knowledge 101 could possibly think this set up could work.

I shifted my weight best that I could to minimize the squeaking, creaking, noisy old stand, nocked an arrow and hoped for the best.

Many animals were seen coming and going in all directions nonstop, but the feeder never went off, and nothing came anywhere near my strange anti-ambush spot. Right around sunset I was shocked to see my guide driving up in his noisy pickup, right at the magic bewitching hour that all hunters wait for and put in the hours for. I walked over to the feeder to discover that it was empty, and the battery was dead, and it appeared it hadn’t thrown any corn in a long, long time.

To say I was perplexed is a gross understatement. Making matters much worse, when I asked my guide how it was that the feeder wasn’t working and was much too far away for a decent bowshot, that my stand was unsafe and noisy as all hell, that the sun made me glow with no background cover at all and that the wind was the worst possible for this stand location, that his truck’s muffler announced to the world where we had gone, and that his Aqua Velva aftershave was like an olfactory warning alarm going off, he got his panties in a wad and scoffed me off like I didn’t know what I was talking about. How dare a long haired Yankee bowhunter try to tell a real honest to God Texas ranching cowboy how to kill critters on his grounds?

Yikes! My view of Texas took a very ugly turn for the worse that frightful day, I’m here to tell you.

So the lessons here my friends are mighty obvious. Stealth, safety, silence, wind, sun, background cover, maximum advantage bow shot distance to anticipated animal activity, feeders that are full and operational, decent ground vegetation so the animals have confidence to show up and move about, scent control by all players, don’t quit hunting until all shooting light or legal shooting light is over.

Big fun, happy and successful hunts, gratifying time afield and backstraps come to those who pay attention to the plethora of little details. I assure you, the critters are paying attention to every little detail, and if they pay more attention than we do, they win.  I like it when I win better, so I leave nothing to chance. Even when we do everything perfect to the best of our ability, that mystical sixth sense of the beast can turn the tables on the best of us. Think hard, think like a predator, think like an animal, learn your lessons well, and eventually backstraps will be yours. Details, details, details. Cover them all and hunt like you mean it. Me, I’m addicted to backstraps baby. I hunt to win. I hunt to kill.

 

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