Archive for April, 2008

13 votes, average: 3.69 out of 513 votes, average: 3.69 out of 513 votes, average: 3.69 out of 513 votes, average: 3.69 out of 513 votes, average: 3.69 out of 5 (13 votes, average: 3.69 out of 5)
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Published by Kelly Johnson on 03 Apr 2008

Why you shouldn’t shoot a skunk

Back yard of Detroit Suburbia.
Life is good, kids asleep, neighbors over for a cocktail and little suburban backyard fire pit.

All is right with the world.

And here he comes.

Everyone’s a little buzzed. Guy from 3 doors down says ” Dude…$20 says ya can’t tag the stink kitty with the Rytera.”

Are you freakin’ kidding me?

Never, and I mean NEVER challenge Kelly after Jimmy’s been visiting.

Stealth mode to the garage, 3 boys behind me giggling like school girls.

Locked and loaded and around the back. Girls are smarter….they go next door.

He’s in the neigbors yard now but he’s with me. Kenny? Clear for takeoff?
“Take um”

Judo does a number even in the darkness we can tell…but lil evil aint done.

Reverse…..right back to us spraying his love juice all the way.

Dog? Direct hit.
Fence? Covered.

The juice is like olfactory napalm. Nauseating.

The girls are moving down a house yelling already, not 90 seconds into it.

He’s done. The aftermath is excruciating. No one is laughing anymore. Even the crickets have silenced in awe at our stupidity.

Kenny says ” I’ll grab your arrow, my stupid idea”

It’s still in him. He grabs the shaft and the skunk returns from the dead dangling from the shaft and sprays him dead in the chest.

And me, and the other 2 jackals who thought “aint my yard”

It’s an hour old and my neighbors have wisely fled to their own spousley punishment…not near the ferocity of mine.

My kids are awake. They ALL are.4 doors down I can hear yelling conversations only making out words like “school night” and “Motel” and “jackass”

So I sit in my garage, where I’ll be sleeping tonight, with my laptop and a clothes pin on my nose. Here to warn others of my foolishness.

Don’t shoot it unless it’s far away and you never, ever plan on using that arrow again.

*** Under no circumstances does the author condone drinking Jack Daniels or Jim Beam with a Bow and Arrow chaser. The above is a work of pure fiction…well most of it…ok, some of it….

3 votes, average: 1.67 out of 53 votes, average: 1.67 out of 53 votes, average: 1.67 out of 53 votes, average: 1.67 out of 53 votes, average: 1.67 out of 5 (3 votes, average: 1.67 out of 5)
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Published by Hyunchback on 03 Apr 2008

Another day at bow bending

Today’s shooting was not as tight as I wish. It could be that I was just “off” or whatever.

I have recently replaced my copy of Larry Wise’s “Core Archery” and begun re-reading it. There are two people who I have read which I feel put more thought into how they do what they do than anyone else and Larry Wise is one of them (the other is James Park).

Today I followed Larry Wise’s advise about finding one’s stance. I drew my arrow, lined up my sight and closed my eyes and let time pass. When I opened them I was pretty much on the bale and target with my sights. I think I’m working with a fairly close approximation of a good stance but I’ll keep checking.

Despite my arrows being more scattered than I would have liked I have begun to batter the vanes. That’s okay, though. This set of shafts were fletched straight and I need an offset for use of broadheads later.

Since the closing of my nearest archery shop I’m going to be forced to learn to do more work on my bow and arrows. Goody! Always willing to learn.

2 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5 (2 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
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Published by bowgod on 03 Apr 2008

hoyt tuning made easy (z3,c2,vector,zepher,and spiral cams)

Here is  VERY simple time tested method that I use for tuning most of the newer cam systems that Hoyt has introduced over the last few years. This method will also work with the popular cam 1/2 and cam 1/2+ systems as well as other hybrid cams (except binaries) with just the possiblility of a little more work than outlined here.

The fist thing that need to be is you need to determine all the advertised specs for your paticular bow/cam combination. (find all the specs on the hoyt tune charts under the customer service link on Hoyt’s web site) you need to know string and cable lengths as well as draw length, draw weight, axle to axle and brace height measurements. Write all the numbers down on a peice of paper and keep it handy.

Now onto the tuning process.

STEP 1: press the bow and remove the string and cables. You want to measure each cable and twist it down to where it measures 1/8 of an inch shorter than the listed lengths (be sure the string is straight and stretched out for this measurement often times the ends are still bent where the end serving wraps around the cam these need to be straightend). with each cable twisted 1/8 shorter than listed specs put the cables back on the bow and move onto the string.

STEP 2: Basically you want to do the same thing with the string but with the string twist it down to 3/16 of an inch shorter than listed length, then put it back on the bow.

STEP 3: From this point everything is going to be close, take the bow out of the press and start checking all the specs. First tighten both limb bolts all the way down, then check the performance marks on the cam. (in every bow i have worked on excluding the regular cam 1/2 the performance marks are right on by this point, with the cam 1/2 you may need to mess with the control cable just a bit to get the performance marks right) Now that the performance marks are on check your ATA and brace height, in most cases the ATA will be right on and the brace may run just a little on the long side, once you check this move onto draw stop timing. using a draw board or have someone draw the bow for you and watch the cams. The draw stop on the top cam should hit the cable at the same time as the draw stop on the bottom cam. If the bottom is hitting before the top your top cam is under rotated, and vice versa, if the top cam is hitting first. From here more than likely you will need to make some minor adjustments, if the top cam is under rotated you can either add twist to the buss cable or take twist out of the control cable. I always use the control cable for under rotated top cam unless my ATA is coming in on the long side or if the brace height is coming in too short (for me either of these are a rarity) i say this because twisting and untwisting the bess cable will have a greater impact on the ATA and brace height than messing with the control cable. Now if the top cam is over rotated you basicaly do the opposite either take twist out of the buss cable or add twist to the control cable. (for these adjustments i ussually use the buss cable because as previously stated the brace height may be running a little long and untwisting the buss cable will fix that, if the ATA  and brace height are already on then i will use the control cable for this as well.  Make these adjustments in small increments it don’t take many twist to get it right.

STEP 4: Now that you have that all done you need to check the AMO draw length and make sure it is at spec. To do this draw the bow and have someone mark your arrow right at the center of the rest hole (AMO draw length measurements are measured from the nock groove to the pivot point of the grip wich happens to be right in line with the center of the rest hole so measureing to the rest hole just makes this a little easier.) Now measure from the inside of the nock groove to the mark on your arrow and then add 1.75 inches to that measurement, this will reflect the AMO draw length of the bow. Twist or untwist the string from here to get the AMO draw length set right to where it needs to be. If your measurement is saying it’s too long then add a few twist to the string if it’s too short take a few out (5 twist either way = aprox. 1/4 inch) once you get the AMO draw length set right double check the max weight of the bow and from here you should be done.

If for any reason you get to any step and notice that something is way off from where it is supposed to be start over at step one because more than likely one of the measurements was off. If the problem still isn’t fixed feel free to contact me on WWW.ARCHERYTALK.COM under the username BOWGOD and i will gladly walk you through it the best i can.

I have been personally using this method for years now and in every case this method has gotten me so close to perfect the first time around, just a few small adjustments after you put it all back together after step 2 and the bow is ready to rock. I have tried several tuning methods over the years and this is by far the easiest way to get my bows tuned right into their sweet spot with no headaches.

Good luck and shoot straight.

4 votes, average: 1.50 out of 54 votes, average: 1.50 out of 54 votes, average: 1.50 out of 54 votes, average: 1.50 out of 54 votes, average: 1.50 out of 5 (4 votes, average: 1.50 out of 5)
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Published by mark kennedy on 02 Apr 2008

Has the Solocam reached its limit?

recently i have been hearing a lot of bow bashing, brand A is better than brand B because of this and because of that. Typical things you know, but then i heard one At’er refer specifically to mathews solocam design.  This Poster elaborated that mathews was fast becoming obsolete to bowtech.  Now i am definatly not a mathews expert, but one i have shot both brand bows and personally i feel mathews to have the more advaned technology, and two i’m pretty sure mathews sales are through the roof. 

This poster also explained how mathews has not had a good selling bow since the switchback which they hardly sell anymore.  1 the switchback is still one of the hottest selling bows and 2 what is the drenalin? chopped liver! His only suggestion was that mathews drop the solocam design and start working on a new cam.  While this may be something mathews should do i believe that the solocam is still a top choice amonge many shooters.

5 votes, average: 3.40 out of 55 votes, average: 3.40 out of 55 votes, average: 3.40 out of 55 votes, average: 3.40 out of 55 votes, average: 3.40 out of 5 (5 votes, average: 3.40 out of 5)
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Published by archeryhistory on 02 Apr 2008

40 Years of Compound Designs: The Changes I Have Seen

Oh the changes I have seen in the compound bow!-From when I first started designing and shooting them in the early 70’s-until now. During those first years of selling the four wheeled compound, the market was limited, four wheelers were the only design available. At Martin we worked on the Kam Act and the one cam Dynabo around 1974. By 1976 the two wheel models were released and they soon took the market from the four wheel designs. The single cam Dynabo continued to sell into the middle 80’s.

One of the problems facing all bows at that time was string and cable stretch. The stretching was less of a problem for the four wheel bows than it was for the all string Dynabo. All string meant more stretching. Airline cables were used for the bus cables on standard compounds and this meant less string stretch for cabled bows. Around 1990 improved bowstring technology nearly eliminated any problems with string stretch.

Once the two wheel bows were perfected in the late 1970’s the four wheel models started to disappear. By the early 90’s the market was ready for some new ideas. In 1992 Matt McPherson started Mathews and reintroduced the one cam design. McPherson promoted his “Solocam” idea heavily via magazines and paid shooter programs. This highly effective advertising caused the single cam system to take over the market. The demand for one cam bows was driving the majority of bow sales-until recently. Even though the single cam was not as fast as a two cam bow, the promotional claim of “no tuning needed” created great deal of sales.

By 1998 Hoyt reintroduced and promoted 1 ½ or hybrid cam system designed by Darton. We now have several manufacturers making a move towards hybrid dual cam designs. Dual cam bows are faster and because of improved string material the tuning problems are minimal. What will the future bring? I can assure you that us bow designers are working on lots of fun new toys. I feel that the hybrid dual cam systems will continue to take over more of the market. Our bow sales definitely show this to be true.-Terry Martin

Jennings4 wheel Arrowstar, Martin 2 wheel Cougar II, Martin single cam Dynabo, Mathews Ultra-light Solocam, Martin`08 hybrid dual cam Firecat.)

(Progression of bows from left to right: Jennings4 wheel Arrowstar, Martin 2 wheel Cougar II, Martin single cam Dynabo, Mathews Ultra-light Solocam, Martin`08 hybrid dual cam Firecat.)

1 vote, average: 3.00 out of 51 vote, average: 3.00 out of 51 vote, average: 3.00 out of 51 vote, average: 3.00 out of 51 vote, average: 3.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
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Published by wyojon137 on 02 Apr 2008

Just Some Notes

I really love the Idea of this blog and article page.  I think it will really give all of us a chance to express our views on the subjects we cover here without to much bickering.  I definatley encourage comments and replys to posts, but archery opinions are like a**holes, everyone has one and I will be the first to admit that I definatley have my own, but I don’t think we should press them on eachother so negativley.  Hopefully I am making sence to some of you and not just rambling.  Anyway I plan on using this site quite regularly, not for the contest although that is a definite perk, but just for its atmosphere. 

Anyway I was reading the admin. anouncements and some of the sujested topics to write about and I came across the one on the best ATV and thought I would say a few words about it.  Now don’t take the following wrong as I own an ATV myself, but I really think that the best ATV is the one that you leave at camp.  Of coarse there are certain reasons that a hunter might have to use an ATV to hunt (like a disability) but the outdoors was definitley not created to hunt or really even get around on a four wheeler.  I really think, and I may be being stereotypical here, that more people need to get out on foot or even horseback and really enjoy the outdoors.  The way that they were intended to be enjoyed.  Not only will you see more game, but I guarentee that when you do get what creature your after, you will be much more pleased with yourself.  I know I feel a great sence of acomplishment, pride, honor and heritage when I take game.  My fore fathers never had ATVs and to be honest, I don’t think that they would have used them.  Anyway, get out there and enjoy the wonderful outdoors.  Even if it on an ATV, but you might try leaving it at camp sometime, you will be suprised at what you never saw before or haven’t seen in a while.

JON  

4 votes, average: 2.75 out of 54 votes, average: 2.75 out of 54 votes, average: 2.75 out of 54 votes, average: 2.75 out of 54 votes, average: 2.75 out of 5 (4 votes, average: 2.75 out of 5)
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Published by Hyunchback on 01 Apr 2008

Reflections

I look back on what I did during my last archery binge. It’s hard to ignore since some of the evidence is still with me. I have over half a dozen archery releases representing hundreds of dollars I spent on just one aspect of the shot. I have 4 different sets of arrows. I had 4 bows, pared down to 1 and now up to 2.

I realize that a lot of what I did the last time was to try and buy my way into skill. I learned some lessons, especially about back tension but what is more I learned to stop trying to spend my way to success.

I put 3 of the sets of arrows and one of the bows into my storage unit. I’m concentrating on one bow, one set of arrows, one sight, one stabilizer, one release. The decision is to stick with the bow I purchased for hunting, using it for 3D as a way to practice for hunting.

Working with my bow today felt good. I wasn’t thinking “if I buy X then I’ll be on target”. I was thinking “basics. form. consistency. sight picture. shot sequence.”

I’m not a champion archer but I’m not yet as good an archer as I could become. My eyes are not very useful at any distance but I can still learn to estimate distances and practice shooting at different distances.

And the most basic part is to have fun. To want to go to the range not to try out some new doohickey. It’s so that I can feel like I had a good time.

Yes, I still have to spend. On basics like inserts and nocks and points. Shafts and fletching. Not new ones. Just ones lost through normal use. Just replacements for the same tackle, not something new.

I think I’m going to have more fun this time around.

2 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5 (2 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
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Published by mark kennedy on 01 Apr 2008

Chew On This

I took some time to fiddle around with some new foods, and ingredients over the last few days and I gotta tell ya, some of these recipes are great.  I’m a huge fan of jerky myself, so i figured i’d post the rest of the recipes up here for everybody to try.  Some of them can be a little on the spicy side so be careful.

Chinese Beef Jerky,
3 Lbs. Flank Steak or London Broil

MARINADE
1/2 Cup Light Soy Sauce
4 1/2 Tbs Honey
4 1/2 Tbs Dry Sherry
6 Large Cloves Garlic Minced
1 1/2 Tbs Ginger Fresh Minced
1 1/2 Tbs Red Pepper crushed
1 1/2 Tbs Sesame Oil
Dash White Pepper

Cut meat in half, lengthwise and slice diagonally crosswise into paper thin strips 1 1/2 to 2 inches wide and 4 inches long. Transfer to shallow pan. Combine marinade ingredients and rub thoroughly into meat. Arrange meat on racks and let dry at cool room temperature overnight (do not refrigerate).

Preheat oven to 250 F. Line two large baking sheets with foil and set wire racks on top of each baking sheet. Arrange meat on racks in single layer. Bake 30 minutes.

Reduce heat to 175 F and continue drying meat another 40 minutes. Meat should be lightly brown but not burnt. Let meat  continue to dry on racks at cool room temperature overnight before packing into jars.

Dried meat can be brushed lightly with sesame oil for additional flavor and shine. Makes about 36 pieces.

cook these next few in the same manner, be careful there pretty wild

Hot & Tangy Jerky
1 tsp salt 2 cloves crushed garlic
1/4 tsp cracked pepper 2 tbs A-1 sauce
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper 3 tbs Worcestershire sauce
1 tsp onion powder 1/2 tsp paprika

Hot and Spicy
1/4 c soy sauce
1/4 c Worcestershire sauce
1/4 c Cayenne pepper sauce
1 t garlic powder
1 t onion powder
1-2 t black pepper
1 t chile powder
1 c water

Hot and smokey
1 part liquid smoke
2 parts Worchestershire suuce
4 parts soy sauce
lots of (freshly) ground black pepper

Now many of you have read the antelope recipe posted yesterday, well heres an antelope recipe for jerky, though i haven’t personally tried this one because i have never shot an antelope!

CAJUN ANTELOPE JERKY

Ingredients:
• 10 lb antelope meat
• 1/2 of a small bottle hot sauce
• 1/8 cup lemon juice
• 10 oz Worchestershire sauce
• 6 oz Soy sauce
• 1/8 cup Caynne pepper
• 1/2 small Bottle onion salt
• 1/2 small Bottle liquid smoke

Directions:
1. Mix ingredients.
2. Marinate 24-30 hrs.
3. Dehydrate in dehydrator or a 150-degree oven.

I hear that this one has a very sweet taste, i’ll have to order some antelope so i can try it myself

8 votes, average: 3.75 out of 58 votes, average: 3.75 out of 58 votes, average: 3.75 out of 58 votes, average: 3.75 out of 58 votes, average: 3.75 out of 5 (8 votes, average: 3.75 out of 5)
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Published by djohns13 on 01 Apr 2008

Photo of a Lifetime

Each January, I always finding myself having bittersweet feelings about the end of archery deer season. On the negative side, I never seem to have hunted enough, taken the biggest buck in the woods or harvested as many does as I had planned on. On the positive side, however, I always find the season to have been very satisfying with lots of memories and some great meat in the freezer. As I put my bowhunting equipment away, I smile as I reach for my camera bag and equipment. As satisfying as an archery harvest is, I love to “harvest” wildlife with the camera as well. I actually find that the skills necessary to be successful in one of the endeavours applies to the other and the two hobbies complement each other quite nicely. As I head out with the camera in hand, I realize that it isn’t so bad that archery season is ten months away.

Recent winters in Indiana have been virtually non-existent with warm temperatures and minimal snow cover so food and warmth have been found in abundance. With the great conditions and minimal hunting pressure in my particular area, the deer population is exploding. In May, I was able to capture a photo from about twenty five feet away of a doe that appeared to be in the initial stages of labor. While she tolerated my presence for a while, eventually she waddled away toward more private surroundings and I left feeling very fulfilled for having had the experience. Of all of the young deer that I have seen later in the year, I have often wondered if any of them were her fawns.

June 12 turned out to be one of the best days I have ever spent in the woods. For many years it has been one of my goals to take a picture of a newborn whitetail fawn. I felt it had to be a close-up and the fawn had to be as close to newborn as possible. I almost didn’t see the woods on this particular day due to it being a very stressful, heavy workload day, a typical Monday in every aspect. By lunchtime I felt the stress of the job beginning to bury me so I decided to grab the camera and take a quick hike. Once in the woods, I decided that if I wanted to get that photo, I needed to get off the beaten deer trails and get to the thicker areas where the fawns might be laying. What a great decision that turned out to be. I slowly wandered through the cover trying to spot any brown spots on the forest floor that might be the elusive photo I had been waiting on. The May Apple plants were dying back and drying out so there were plenty of brown spotted false alarms. After walking for about 500 yards, I noticed yet another brown spot and looked closer to try to see the accompanying white spots but to no avail. As I started to move on, I had a feeling that I should look again, this time closer. Again I studied the spot but try as I might I couldn’t will the brown spot into a fawn. Once more I turned to leave but that nagging feeling returned. So for a third time I studied the brown patch and just as I was ready to turn away I noticed a brown ear flick. Talk about an adrenaline rush! I could hardly believe that I was so close to completing my quest. Very slowly, I eased over to the newborn, always watchful for a very mad protective mamma. Finally I was within three feet of the fawn and could hold my camera right over top of her to get some nice pictures. The whole time she was totally still except for her nose that was wriggling constantly trying to figure out if I was friend or foe. After getting a few photos I decided to head out before mamma came back with harmful intentions for me. I can still vividly remember my heart pounding and the amazement of finally getting the photo. I went back to work with all of the Monday work stress having evaporated into the forest air.

Two weeks later I was in the same patch of woods again scouting for fall when I suddenly felt that I was being watched. Having learned repeatedly over time that the feeling is usually correct, I stopped and surveyed the scene in front of me. Not seeing anything, I gave a quick look back over my shoulder and saw a very curious and healthy looking fawn that had come out of a thicket and trailed me for a while. I will never know if the two are the same, but it somehow seems too coincidental to not be. Thankfully, the fawn seemed to pose for a few good photos before retreating to the safety of the thicket.

As happy and thankful as I am for each and every archery harvest, the pictures on my wall of a newborn whitetail fawn will always be considered my favorite trophy. Not that I have checked off this accomplishment off my list, maybe I can get lucky and add a 180″ Indiana whitetail to my list of accomplishments!

3 votes, average: 2.67 out of 53 votes, average: 2.67 out of 53 votes, average: 2.67 out of 53 votes, average: 2.67 out of 53 votes, average: 2.67 out of 5 (3 votes, average: 2.67 out of 5)
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Published by mark kennedy on 01 Apr 2008

An Old Archers Challenge

back when i was first younger and i wanted to get my first bow, I wanted to get a really nice compound i had seen in the local archery shop.  Man i went in there every other day and looked at that bow, waiting for the day grandpa was gonna bring it home for me. Now when the time came and my grandfather came package in hand i can honestly say i was more than a little disappointed to see not the fast compound bow i wanted, but his old bear recurve bow.

Now i loved my grandpa to death, and I’m sure he must have noticed my disappointment because he said to me, I know you wanted that bow, hanging at toms but when you can show me you are gonna stay with it and shoot, we’ll see.  You need to learn to shoot the right way he told me, back when he was shooting there were no sights or cams or compound bows, just recurves and longbows.  So everyday i went out and shot my recurve, no sight, just a couple of mismatch carbon arrows and a shooting glove.

Christmas rolled around and i remember being more than a little anxious at whether grandpa thought i was ready to shoot the compound bow yet.  All the presents came thru, but no bow.  What i did get was a dozen new carbon arrows all my own.  I was so excited I went downstairs and shot all thru christmas vacation.  By the time I finally got the bow, i had become so attached to the recurve I was unsure what i was really going to do. 

Then i saw it brand new, shining, with a pin sight and an actual arrow rest, and a release!  Grandpa gave me the bow and let me shoot but the very first thing i noticed was how easy it was to aim!  Now that i was older grandpa explained to me how shooting instinctively had made it easier for me to hold steady because i was hitting x’s looking at nothing, and now i had something to look at, things just came easy.

I still have my old recurve even though i haven’t shot it since but I have never shot as good with any bow as i did with that bow. Maybe one of these days I’ll get into the instinctive shooting like my grandpa started me in, I just don’t know if i could hack it anymore. I just know the challenge my grandpa gave me when i first started is what gave me the push i needed, to get where i am today.

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