Archive for the 'Bowhunting' Category

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Published by airborne49719 on 08 Jul 2009

The Journey from Right hand shooting to Left hand!

 

    I was introduced to archery at a very young age. This was kind of expected of the boys from our family that grew up in the back woods of the eastern end of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. My first bow was a 30 to 50 LB Darton compound bow. My dad bought it for my 11Th Birthday. It had no sights and when I asked my dad why the bow didn’t have sights he replied with “you have to earn them” so I asked being young and naive “how do I earn them then” and that is when he told me. When you can put six arrows in a pie plat at 15 yards I will get you sights for your bow. I spent all summer shooting that year trying to put six arrows in a pie plate. This was a hard task to accomplish at my age and at times I got so discouraged I just wanted to quite but my passion for hunting at this age had only begun. As the summer went by I tried my best but could never really get the hang of it completely.  My dad would watch and coach me telling me that I was dropping my arm or I wasn’t keeping my anchor points the same it was ruff. Plus my fingers would hurt from shooting for hours.   

  

    Then one day my dad while he was watching and coaching me I got really frustrated I was at 15 yards and still could not get my group to get any smaller than the size of a plate. He started to talk to me about  when I was even younger and how he would take me with him some times to meet a group of guys that always came to the Upper Peninsula from Ohio to bow hunt. These guys were quite the group they loved to party and tell stories about when they were younger and all the trouble they got into as they grew up.  For a kid it made going to deer camp so much fun. But it was there at deer camp around all those guys and my dad that I had learned about instinctive shooting. All the guys would get ready for opening day by pulling out a hundred dollar bill and put them on the bail of hay. The first one to put the arrow in the center of the bill at 20 yards won that round then they would back up to 30 yards and do it all over again sometimes they would even go as far as trying to do trick shots. It was this day that I remembered all the guys out shooting at those bills. How could they do it, what were they doing that I wasn’t. Then I realized they were just honing there skills to make them selves better and having fun while doing it.

 

    My dad asked me why don’t you go back to 5 yards and shoot. I looked at him and said but dad I have already mastered the pie plate at those ranges. That is when he reminded me about those guys and him shooting at the hundred dollar bills at 20 yards.  He then told me that if I move back up to 5 yards.  I would need to start working at grouping my arrows tighter in the target and picking different points on the target to aim at and you will improve. I took his advice and moved back up to the 5 yard mark and shot at the target like he told me. I felt like I had started all over again. But to my surprise I learned pretty quick that my grouping was not all that great and when I picked different points on the target I would be a half inch to a inch off.   I finally got the hang of it after I went back to the 5 yard mark and started over.  It was the summer I turned 12. I finally was able to put the six arrows in the pie plate at 15 yards. I got my sights and to boot my dad got me the new ball bearing release.  

 

    I have shot my fair share of deer in the past years with my bows that I have owned. I joined the Army in August of 2001 and it wasn’t till I deployed in February 2007 for Operation Iraq Freedom that would change my life. While I was deployed in Iraq we lost our first Soldier in March 2007 to a vehicle born improvised device. It was a dump truck loaded with 16,000 lbs of explosives that put a thirty foot crater in the ground. Since that day we had minor casualties up until August 2007.  When a Black Hawk crashed and Fourteen Soldiers perished in the wreck from the 25thInfantry Division. It was the day of the memorial service for the fourteen. My whole Company went to the memorial service paying there respect to the fallen Soldiers. I am not sure to this day why I left early to go back to my office but I did. It was there at my office where I meet SGT Collins, CPL Cornell, and PFC Axtell. I let every one in the office mind you that our office was your basic tin garage package minus the garage doors.  I was sitting at my desk and just finished talking to SGT Collins and CPL Cornell as they turned to leave and PFC Axtell was just entering the building from smoking a cigarette.  When a 127mm Brazilian rocket land five meters from the building. SGT Collins was KIA instantly he also took the brunt of everything that would have hit me. CPL Cornell was seriously wounded he received multiple wounds to his legs and upper body. PFC Axtell was also seriously wounded both of his legs were severed off at the waste. I was not wounded as bad as everyone else due to SGT Collins being only a foot and half away from me and taking the brunt of the shrapnel that would have hit me. I was the only one to walk out of that building on my own two feet that day. CPL Cornell and PFC Axtell are both doing really good and are a big inspiration to me on how i live my life now. PFC Axtell now SPC is out of the Army and has competed in two triathlon’s since he was wounded.

  

  I was very lucky that day for I must of had someone watching over me. I received shrapnel wounds to my right eye, top of the head and down the left side of my body. I was medivac to ballad, Iraq were they did my first surgery on my right eye to remove a large junk of shrapnel from my cornea that was allowing the fluid to leak out from my eye. I was then medivac back to Brook Army Medical Center in Texas. It was at Wilford Hall in Texas that I meet a Air force Doctor (Dr. Lane). He conducted my second Surgery which consisted of removing the rest of the shrapnel that was in my right eye and draining all the bad fluid and blood, he also did a lens transplant and sewed my Iris shut this surgery took around three hours. Since then I had a detached retina surgery in June 2009 to boot.  The seriousness of the eye injury is why I am here writing today it has been almost two years since that day in Iraq and my shooting style had to change.

 

    I just recently purchased my first left handed Compound Bow a Mathews Hyperlite.  But it took me a long time to finally switch to a left hand bow but I am glad that I did.  When I first got back from the hospital in September 2007 I was stationed at Fort Riley, KS the home of Monster Whitetail. I went straight into trying to make pins for my hoyt bow that would allow me to shot my right handed bow. I went to home depot and purchased some threaded rod 1/8 inch and took the dermal and started to make the pins I then found a old cobra sight bracket it all fit together perfectly but the bow look hideous. I didn’t care as long as it worked. The second time out in the woods I forgot my glasses and I took a stick to the right eye walking out in the dark so that ended archery season that year for me. I was then sent to Fort Carson, Co in June 2008 I love it here. I got so excited when I got out here “Elk” was the only thing I could think of and archery season was coming. I got my hoyt out and started to practice but after shooting right handed with my left eye it started to feel uncomfortable and I wasn’t sure why. I passed up a spike elk that season at 36 yards because I started to doubt myself and the ability to shoot right handed with being left eye dominate now.

 

    So in February of 2009 I bought a Mathews Hyperlite. This bow is awesome and Bill set me up right in every way. I went in to the Archery hut here in Colorado Springs and talked to the owner Bill about my situation and explained what I was looking for in a bow. He pulled his bow out from the office and said this is my hunting bow a Mathews right handed Hyperlight. He says its smooth easy to pull and light for packing around after elk. He let me shoot his hyperlite and I fell in love with that bow. After I shot it I looked at Bill and told him to order me one in left hand 55 to 65 lb pull.

 

   

I have been going to the range every chance I get to shoot it.  Took only two weeks to make the switch completely of brushing my right arm with the string and get the form of left handed shooting down. I am now once again chomping at the bit for elk archery season to begin. I will say this much from shooting right handed to switching to left handed it takes practice and it can be done. I am now shooting as good if not better left handed then I was right handed all because of the growing pains that I went through as a kid and learning how to shoot instinctive.  If you are going to learn you must be able to step back and think about everything you are doing in all situations to be able to grow in life.              

  

SGT Bennett

United States Army

 

“An army of deer led by a lion is more to be feared than an army of lions led by a deer.”

Chabrias 410–375 B.C. 

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Published by AZelkhntr on 02 Jul 2009

Lucky 13

lucky-13                                                           Lucky 13

 

Where to start? I have been bowhunting for about the last 12 years. I owe the discovery of bowhunting and all that it means to me to a good friend of mine. Ray Kessler,prior to meeting him I was a rifle hunter for most of my life. I met my hunting partner and friend Ray at work right after he started working there. It didn’t take long before we got on the subject of hunting. I had tried bowhunting with a recurve on a occasion or two. Ray on the other hand had bowhunted most of his life. After a few conversations with Ray it didn’t take long before I was at the local archery shop buying my first compound bow. Since buying that first bow I have become addicted. The feeling of being so close to animals and nature that you get with bowhunting is unlike any other hunting in my opinion. We have hunted together for the last 12 years and have experienced some awesome times, from me shooting my first deer with a bow to sitting on a hilltop and watching two huge bulls fighting to see who is the king of the hill. Bowhunting has  and is the passion that drives me.

 

2007 started out like many others with both of us putting in to try and draw a covenant elk tag. Unfortunately we were not successful, this was disappointing and rewarding all in one. Although we did not draw a elk tag we knew that meant one thing, we were going to be focusing all of our attention on a trip to Kaibab to hunt the huge mule deer of the Kaibab.

 

We made the 6 and a half hour drive to the Kaibab plateau a month before opening day to do some scouting set up our game cams and try to pinpoint a game plan for opening day. While driving up there we had a pretty good idea already where we would be hunting. I have hunted the Kaibab several times in the last 12 years and Ray has been going there for the last 25 years, first with his dad and then with friends and family. On the ride up there he stated that he had just realized that this would be his 25th year hunting the Kaibab and had taken several deer out of there but had never taken a really nice buck yet. We both agreed that this year was going to be different. After our scouting trip we were both very excited we had seen some great bucks and couldn’t wait for opening day.

 

We arrived two days before opening day and everything looked really good, we went out checked our game cams and saw some nice bucks and the mood in the camp was very upbeat. Opening day arrived and we were both sitting treestands hoping for one of the bucks we had seen earlier to make the mistake of walking by us. It was not meant to be, due to all of the other hunters in the area we believed that the big bucks must have gone in to hiding.

 

The next 11 days were pretty uneventful, we both had seen smaller bucks and we both had oppurtunities to harvest a smaller buck. We passed on harvesting smaller bucks in hope of getting a chance at a bigger one. The motto for our camp was “You will never shoot a big one if you keep shooting smaller ones”

 

The last day of the hunt was upon us and we knew it was make or break time. We woke up at 4:00am with high hopes. This was our thirteenth day of hunting and we were determined to make it a Lucky 13. We were driving to our hunt area when Ray looked at me and said. We just drove by a great buck feeding about 150 yards up in the treeline. Needless to say we both got pretty excited. We came up with a quick plan to drive up a ways and stalk into the treeline and then wait. In hopes that the buck would feed to us.

 

 

We made it to the treeline undetected. It was freezing that morning and we both spent the next half hour trying to stay still and not give away our spot by our uncontrollable shivering. Finally I saw deer legs through the trees. It didn’t take long before we realized if we stayed where we were a shot was not going to happen. We decided to move up about 20 yards to another tree. Ray went first, and when he made it to the tree the deer was just coming into a opening. There was no time to lose if he didn’t take the shot the deer was going to move into some thick timber and we wouldn’t get another opportunity.

Ray ranged the deer at 58 yards, I know some people would not take a shot at this range. Ray and I practice out to 80 yards throughout the year and shoot every 3D tournament we can. It is not uncommon to be presented with shots of this range in the west. We practice at these ranges and only take shots that we know and feel comfortable at making. Ray came to full draw and the arrow was on it’s away, I was watching and knew he had made a good shot. The deer ran off and we both just sat there and couldn’t believe what had just happened. We waited a hour before taking up the tracking , it wasn’t long before we were standing over a great Kaibab buck. Ray looked at me smiling and said who says 13 isn’t lucky. We decided right then that this was the Lucky 13 buck.

 

This hunt wound up being one of the best hunts I have been on. It just shows that perseverance along with a never die attitude usually pays off. I would like to thank my wife for putting up with my obsession, without her understanding of my addiction, living my dream would be a lot harder.

 

 

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Published by tanner on 14 Jun 2009

Northern Triple Crown IBO Shoot

This weekend I was at the second leg of the
northern triple crown and met Jason the owner
of Athens Archery products and some of his
great employes. Their bows and products
are all machined in the USA and are the top
of the line products! They have my vote on
Bow Hook for being the number one bow accessory
of the year!!! They all were very friendly and
know their product inside and out… cause
they design and make all their products.
Thanks and it was nice to meet you guys.

Tanner

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Published by RightWing on 10 Jun 2009

Morning Meeting ………

I walked down the gravel road in the pre-dawn stillness , the first frost of the year lay sparsely on the layer of leaves that littered the ground along my travel route. I could make out the shapes of feeding deer under an old Southern Pin Oak in a clearing just ahead of the point that the gravel road intersected a logging path that leads to my stand sight.I am certain that these deer saw me enter the wood, but it is early in the season and the hunting pressure has been light, besides it couldn’t be avoided.

I finally reach my tree and attach my climber. Thoughts start to fill my head as I ascend to my lofty, elevated perch. Thoughts of past hunts and seasons gone by, some of which had long days spent in this very tree. With all my gear, placed in its own location in the adjacent limbs, I caught movement of a fat young doe gracefully walking along the path, that in moments will lead her a mere twelve yards of my elavated seat. After several minutes, the fat two-year old deer made the final steps placing her squarely into the shooting lane. I placed my site pin tight behind her shoulder and touched the release, she bounded a few yards ahead then turned looking back at the noise totally unaware of what had taken place. The doe steps forward a couple of more paces then fell to her side almost underneath my tree.

I spend the next several minutes watching two playful squirrels. The squirrels would chase each other around and around a thick barked limb of an old White Oak tree. Earlier ,the doe seemed to have been making her way toward that exact tree . The doe was now laying  still on the damp forest floor as I decend from my natural overlook. Reaching the deer, I place my tag onto the sleek robust animal, once again thoughts fill my mind about past hunts as well as looking forard to the ones to come. Sure I have harvested bigger deer and have had more exciting hunts, but today I have provided my family with tender delicious venison. I thanked the good lord and began the process of gathering my gear . I will be back another day. 🙂

Written by:
Jason Wilborn                          Allons,  Tennessee

Jason, lives in Allons TN and enjoys bowhunting and competing in archery events throughout Tennessee and surrounding states. Jason is also a National Bowhunter Education IBEP/NBEF Instructor and a member of the Christian Bowhunters of America

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Published by RightWing on 05 Jun 2009

Beetles and Bowhunting

Jason Wilborn
10/23/05
.

Beetles and Bowhunting……

What was I thinking? Here I am hot, bruised, and bleeding, trying to figure the quickest and easiest path to get out of this mess. O.K., let me explain my problem here. It started out a beautiful mid spring morning, the kind of day custom made to take a nice long nature walk. I decided to go to a place that I had visited several years before on Dale Hollow lake. A short drive to the entrance of the Accordion Trail located near the famed Willow Grove Resort on the Tennessee side of the lake started my journey. This trail runs from Willow Grove to Lillydale camping area, both very popular recreational areas on Dale Hollow.
I made my way through the hardwoods very easily, as the trail meandered along the lake’s edge. I would soon find this to not be the case as I work my way along the trail. Here is where the fun begins, halfway around the trail I started to find fallen trees. The farther I go the more deadfalls I find. These were Pine trees and the fallen trunks made for difficult walking. It was soon obvious that this was not going to be the pleasurable walk that I had anticipated. I soon found myself in a near impenetrable pile of dead pine trees. It was clear at this point that I should have asked more about the trail before taking this hike. The trip around this small section of the lake should have taken around one hour to complete, but with the added obstacles it was more like three. I was finally able to climb, crawl and scratch my way over and through the fallen fauna. Occasionally I would take a break and try to enjoy myself, despite the unwanted pitfalls that I had encountered. It was during these periods of rest that I made the discoveries that lead me to the reason for writing this story.

The large areas of fallen trees had really opened the canopy of the surrounding woods. There where some areas that looked very similar to the way a portion of logged woods would look. The extra sunlight that now made its way to the forest floor caused a surge in growth of green shoots from young hardwoods and bushes. Some of these included valuable deer browse such as young greenbrier, honeysuckle, hearts-a-bursting and other woody plants. Young honey locust trees, as well as young mast bearing trees now received considerably more sunlight and thus flourished. This was a special find on this public tract of land. The substantial plant life and new structure provided excellent cover and food for whitetail and what had began as a brisk nature walk now turned into a preseason scouting trip.

In early September, with just a few weeks left till archery season I made one final scouting trip to the area. My suspicions were confirmed when a jumped several bedded deer, which took very little time retreating from the area. Not to worry, as I knew they would return, because the place had everything a whitetail needs security, subsistence, and with the lake nearby, water.

Early bow season found me hunting my old familiar haunts. The agricultural edges and woodlots that I have hunted and harvested deer at for years, however the little sanctuary stayed on my mind and I vowed that when activity at my usual hotspots subsided, that I would return to it and try my fortune. My chance came in late October after coming back home from a bow hunt in Southeastern Missouri and after filling my Kentucky deer tags earlier in the season. I made my approach quietly through the calm morning water. A dense fog lay heavy on the lake and surrounding woods. It was still archery season in Tennessee and the deer had not received very much hunting pressure at this point. I tied up my boat in a nearby hollow and entered the woods.

I was able to find a suitable white oak tree to attach my stand and soon was looking over a nice opening in the tangle of trees and vines. From this vantage point I could see several small rubs on the remaining pine saplings. This observation was cut short when I noticed movement to my right, a mature doe and her yearling fawn nibbled away at the leaves of some scrubby looking bush. They were unaware of my presence and soon fed on lichen that covered a decaying log before leaving. The shot presentation was tempting, but with a freezer full of venison, I elected to just enjoy the two deer as the feed out of sight. Throughout the morning I saw several other deer, including some small bucks that moved past my elevated position. I never harvested a deer that morning, but I had proven my theory about the newly created habitat. I will return next year to see how much those young bucks have grown and if I haven’t been as fortunate as I was this year, I might look at harvesting one of those plump does for the freezer. As I layout plans for next bow season, I will include this little spot in my rotation.

Once again through nature’s destructive ways something new has emerged and I couldn’t be happier then the day I found a little overlooked section of trail now clogged with fallen trees. With the pine beetles came destruction, but somehow the deer and the Bowhunter have taken advantage of the situation.

Written By:  Jason Wilborn                                Allons,  Tennessee

Jason, lives in Allons TN and enjoys bowhunting and competing in archery events throughout Tennessee and surounding states. Jason is also a National Bowhunter Education IBEP/NBEF Instructor and a member of the Christian Bowhunters of America

 

 

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Published by admin on 26 May 2009

Ted Nugent – THE MYSTICAL FLIGHT OF THE ARROW AS HEALER

 

tedpigs2

THE MYSTICAL FLIGHT OF THE ARROW AS HEALER        by Ted Nugent

The young archer’s gaze was intense, animal like, wild eyed. Master athletes refer to this ultra focused intensity as “in the zone”. You can feel it in the eyes and twitching nerve endings of a killer cat in the final stages of its sneak attack, just before the kill pounce. Locked in.

 Macon was there, mind, body, heart, soul and full on spirit as he carefully pulled back the bowstring with all he had, his eyes squinting in the blazing Texas sun, brow furrowing, head slightly cocked, arrow pointing naturally toward the vitals of the 3D deer target ahead. As the arrow nock touched his lip, the bow silently flexed and sent the feathered shaft on its mystical way. 

 Thunk! Dead center into the golden triangle of the deer‘s forward chest, right where the pumpstation and lungs converge for a perfect bowhunter’s kill shot. A broad smile overpowered the sunshine.

 This daily ritual is not all that out of the ordinary at the more than three million bowhunting families target ranges across America, but on this particular day, this was not a normal, everyday arrow or bowhunter. Macon Lynn is just five years old, had never shot a bow before this day, and had just recently endured the ravaging agony of chemo therapy and radiation treatment for his inoperable brain cancer. This may very well have been the most important arrow in the history of archery, for young Macon was in desperate need of escape from the ravages of this life threatening disease, and he and his family figured an escape to Uncle Ted’s SpiritWild Ranch bowhunting epicenter might very well be just what the Dr. ordered. He did.

 Nearly wearing himself out, Macon shot arrow after arrow for most of the afternoon, and we couldn‘t get the bow out of his hands. Archers and bowhunters know why, for we are convinced that our next arrow will be a better arrow, and we never give up trying. We also know what Macon and all the terminally ill kids discover when in that mystical flight of the arrow trance; that there is nothing else beyond our arrow and its next flight. It is that powerfully mesmerizing. Intoxicating. Joyous. Cleansing. Healing.

 Macon joined the Nugent family through the assistance of the wonderful “Wish Upon A Star” charity. A few weeks later, Make A Wish Foundation made the arrangements for seven year old Brianna to visit us at SpiritWild Ranch and other special need kids have been helped by Hunt Of A Lifetime and our own Ted Nugent Kamp for Kids charities. When people really need help, Americans always give it all they got, and we are genuinely moved by the heartfelt love and generosity of so many great American families everytime. We salute them all.

 Over the years, many Americans have been moved to show appreciation for the dedication and sacrifices of the heroes of the United States Military warriors. Those who pay attention, and care, painfully understand that freedom comes with a price, and that the American Dream is fertilized by the blood and guts of warriors who valiantly volunteered to put their lives on the line for the benefit of others. This is the greatest of human virtuousness, and we stand in awe of their service.

 Having saluted way too many flag draped coffins and stood strong with too many grieving families, we created our Freedom’s Angel’s nonprofit charity a few years ago to help the wounded warriors who have given so much. Upon visiting the severely burned heroes at Brookes Army Medical Facility in San Antonio, Texas, we were reminded that most of the military heroes are avid outdoorsmen and women, but with their burned skin slowly healing, there was no way for them to be exposed to the blistering Texas’ sun and were therefore confined indoors.

 Through the undying generosity of many, Freedom’s Angels was able to construct a beautiful outdoor patio where the burn victims could be in their beloved out of doors, but shielded from the rays of the burning sun.

 As a proud and official representative of the Coalition To Salute America’s Heroes (saluteheroes.org) I have been honored and privileged to host many wounded warriors at our SpiritWild Ranch for hunting, fishing, offloading, shooting, archery and BBQ fun. I am convinced that this is the most powerful healing therapy in the world, and we are throttling ahead to do more for them.

 Though the BBQ is great, the machinegun shooting spectacular, and all our outdoor fun remedial, there is no question that the most smiles occur on the 3D archery range. Some of the guys and gals are experienced archers and bowhunters, but many are newcomers. Each and everyone of them light up as arrows are fired downrange and archery form and control is discovered and cultivated.

 With exuberant support across the board, we are now putting together the details of our next Freedom’s Angels project and creating a state of the art archery range for the troops near the Brookes Medical facility so they can shoot more conveniently and develop their archery skills.

 Daniel Vargas, our gung-ho BloodBrother at Saluteheroes.org is working on the details and I wish to thank everyone who so generously helps to make this a reality.

 Never underestimate the healing powers of the mystical flight of the arrow. If you would like to say thank you to the US Military heroes, visit Saluteheroes.org and give what you can. Godbless the US warriors all!

 A big thank you to Saluteheroes.org, Wish Upon A Star, Hunt Of A Lifetime, American Airlines, Avis Rent-A-Car, Hamilton Inns, Academy Sports, Martin Archery, Scott Archery, Sims Vibration Labs, Easton Arrows, Victory Arrows, GoldTip, Delta and McKenzie targets, Mossy Oak, Primos Double Bull blinds, the National Field Archery Association, Freedom’s Angels, ArcheryTalk.com and tednugent.com

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Published by Scott M on 30 Oct 2008

The Priviledge of Hunting

I’ve hunted on and off for a total of about 11 seasons now, and my attitude about hunting has changed more dramatically than I ever would have imagined.  Starting out I was always in a rush, especially deer hunting.  The minute I saw a flicker of brown or white my gun was on my shoulder and I was trying to find the deer in my scope. 

After harvesting some nice deer, and honestly making some foolish shots, I realized I’m not out here for the kill, I’m out here for the hunt.  That kind of thinking led me choose archery as my first choice for method of hunting these days.

Archery hunters choose to do things the more difficult way.  We have to get closer, we have to be careful of wind, and scent, we have to make a perfect shot, because follow-ups are rarities in the archery woods.

From purchasing the bow last spring, through practicing daily all summer, I couldn’t have been more excited for the Pennsylvania archery season.  The opener came and sure enough I had some action the first morning.

Four doe came in together.  The problem was when I saw the first I thought she was alone.  So, when I turned to get a better look, the big mature doe bringing up the rear saw me in the tree.  She alerted the rest and they bolted.

I was able to hunt again the first monday night of the season and as I arranged my gear at the base of the tree, two doe came into my setup.  As they fed I was able to nock an arrow and come to full draw while kneeling next to my tree.  The first doe stepped behind some brush, so I settled my 20 yard pin on the second doe.  As I looked her up and down I came to the conclusion she was a yearling.  While it would have been great to punch my tag on my second outing of the year, I asked myself, “is this small doe how I want to use my single doe tag?”  I knew the answer to that question, and slowly let down my bow.  I continued to kneel next to the tree as they fed out of sight.

I spent the next couple of hours in the tree, without another sighting.  Even though I didn’t see another deer that night I felt like that night was the most successful night of hunting I’ve had in a long time.

It’s our priviledge to be in the woods pursuing such amazing creatures, and we choose when to fill our tags, we are never obligated to fill our tags.  That, at least for me, is what makes hunting a great tradition.

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Published by cmgo06 on 14 Oct 2008

memories everyday

 The following is a true story.

 As each day goes bye and I am  thinking about my hold, aimming , and various “littile” things I work on each time. Being hard on my self is something I do and get mad about. For no apparent reason. However shooting a bow has tough me how to slow down and relax.

 Get home see my great kids and very understanding wife. Grab a snack and get to shooting. pratice make prefect they say . So when is it gonna pay off. I know I am “actully” shooting good. Hitting on or with in the “10 ” ring it a great shot in the feild. Yet I still want to hit that x spot. Distance is a game that I have come to find takes time.

Recently I had been invited t ofreiends camp up north (adirondacks area) . What a wonderful place it was, state foot tails near and as many miles as you wanted to walk and see. After a little time to get the feel for were I was I look at a map and got it down. There was basically a large triangle of land I heard was loaded with deer. The problem I relized was at the middle of the triangle was a farily large mountian. Trails lead alaround but up this place. It was know’n area buy hunter but hard to reach from unposted areas. Were I was it wasn’t a hour hike. What a place. I studies the map a while longer and figured I could get around. The guys who tagged me along are looking to take a hike after getting camp opened up. We went a decent hike,  along the foot talis and then following a river and back out, maybe a couple of miles. As I took another look at the map I relized just how large the area was we were entering earlier. what we had ventered was but only the samiliest tip of the iceberg. What an increadile experience that area was.

 A few days later back in reality we talk of making another trip. This time for a two day stay. I was jumping for joy. Now only if the wife is good with it i am in great shape. And what do you know she was. She must be up to something, but I will worry about that later. Now it’s game time.

 I have to admit that I have never been on a true hunting trip. I know laugh now, its ok I understand now what the trill is about up to this point. Feeling a little weary that I may not have it in me, but hell I have done almost everything else but this.Shooting has always been of intrest to me, much to my father’s “sha-grine”. Latley he seems more opening to what I am doing , guess its just I am older and he hasn’t much say. I am excited and nervious I guess. But I know if I do as I know to do I should be fine. Another day  soon and that much closer to it.

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Published by WayBeau on 07 Oct 2008

First Bow Kill

So opening day of Archery season in Virginia was this past weekend.  I was lucky in that I was able to get out for the opening day.  The last time I was able to get out for a season opener was probably 6 years ago, and it was for duck season in Mississippi.  So to actually be able to get out on opening day was great in its own right.

My bowhunting to this point has been nothing but foam in the back yard.  But let me tell you, that darn cube target from Walmart has been “killed” more times than it wants to admit, and will continue to meet my arrows until it simply can’t stop them anymore.  My father-in-law, who gave me just about every piece of archery equipment that I own and doesn’t even bowhunt, decided he wanted to scout some areas that morning and we headed to the woods.  Since I knew he wasn’t going up there to hunt, I decided to sacrifice getting into the stand before day light and took the chance of blowing the whole hunt by stomping my way to my tree.

I was in my stand, ready for action around 6:50 a.m.  Well, as my track record goes in this stand, all I saw for the first hour and a half were a bunch of squirrels (one of which almost joined me) and the occassional bird.  Around 8:15 I found myself dozing off and figured, “What the hell, I’m not missing anything anyway.”  So I decided I’d take a short nap.  Well, good ole Mr. Murphy decided to make an appearance.  I shut my eyes for what seemed like an hour (really it was only 5 minutes) and was awakened by the sound of crunching leaves.  Thanks to the squirrels, I didn’t really think too much of it until I saw something much larger than a squirrel moving out in front of my stand at around 50 yards.  I knew it was a deer, but I wasn’t sure if it was a buck or a doe.  Though it didn’t really matter, I was hoping that it was a buck since this would be my first bow kill and my very first deer, EVER.  On top of that, there is a doe that frequents this area of woods that has two fawns with her and I wasn’t going to shoot her.  So I wanted it to be a buck so that there wouldn’t be any chance for confusion and accidental shooting of the wrong deer.

To my pleasure I saw horns and started getting myself prepared to stand and draw.  I’m not sure, but I doubt if the sequence of events could have gone any better.  The buck took a few steps and stopped behind a small group of trees and bushes that shielded his view of my stand.  That’s when I stood up.  At this point he was at least 40-45 yards away.  I gave a quick grunt call and he started walking towards me again.  As he stepped behind another tree I drew my bow.  I was at full draw when he turned and started quartering very slightly toward me (he was almost perfectly broadside) at around 30-35 yards.  I settled my pins on him and as I was squeezing the trigger on my release the sun broke the clouds and brightened my pins so much that they blended with his shoulder.  At this point it was too late.  The hair trigger on my release had all ready let the arrow fly.

When I released the arrow, the buck flinched slightly.  Immediately after getting hit, he jumped in the air, spun 180 degrees and took off back through the thickets behind him.  My heart was pounding harder than it ever has.  I knew I had hit him by the way he took off, but I was a little nervous about the hit due to the last second sunshine on my pins.  So I waited an hour which would have felt like much longer had a group of does (including the momma and two fawns) not decided to stop by to snack on the red and white acorns that cover the ground around my stand.

After my hour wait, I got down and went to the last place I saw him.  While there was blood on the ground, I couldn’t find my arrow anywhere.  I was thinking the worst, muscle hit into the bone and he’s taken off with my arrow.  So I start following the blood trail.  I only make it about 40 yards into the thickets when it simply disappears.  At this point I’m starting to get nervous.  I don’t like the idea (I honestly don’t anyone that does) of shooting an animal and just letting it suffer needlessly.  Also, I had read a lot of posts by people that lost deer and I didn’t want to join that group.  So I walked in a zigzag pattern for about 20 yards and there on the ground was more blood.  My heart literally skipped a beat.  From that point on, it was like bread crumbs leading me home.  I found him piled up against a tree not 30 more yards past where I found the trail again.

I won’t bore you with the details of dragging him out of the thickets and down the mountain.  But I will tell you that he could have weighed 300 pounds, I was getting that deer out of the woods.  This was my very first bow kill and my very first deer EVER and I couldn’t be prouder.  While he’s not the biggest deer in the woods, he’ll always be a trophy to me.

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Published by Will P. on 26 Sep 2008

What Hunting is to Me.

What Is Hunting

It’s a spiritual interaction between man and nature

It’s where I feel closest to my maker

It’s the only peace in a chaotic world

It’s where me and the old man ever get time alone

It’s a two mile hike in single digit weather

It’s sitting in a chair twenty feet up for eight hours

It’s one part adrenaline and nine parts relaxation

To put it simple…

It’s Hunting

 

 

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