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Published by RightWing on 19 Feb 2011

The Witching Hour On Ashburn’s Creek…..

Big Tennessee Gar....

The Late May sun set low in the Western sky as he approached the half-submerged willow trees. Ripples appeared as he drifted ever closer, he scanned the water for any movement, ready to gently stow the push -pole at moment’s notice. The sounds of trashing fish filled evening air as the spawning carp danced their age-old waltz that has become such a welcome rite of spring.

Our friend’s eyes soon become drawn to a brown, shapely figure that slowly became visible in the shallow what that lay before him. He reached for his bow that lay ready at his side, as his fingers applied pressure to the bowstring he soon found himself at full draw. This is the point where the logical mind subsides to that of raw, instinctive reactions and reflexes that can only be gained from repetitive shooting, achieved from similar outings throughout years past. Things happen quickly, and details become lost in the fleeting seconds, as the fish descends to deeper water and the archer releases the arrow; An arrow set aflite on a skewed course predetermined by our archer using calculated leads that could only be learned from past experiences.

For a moment time stood still, and our fisherman held his breath, uncertain of what had taken place, only when he heard the tale-tell sounds of line stripping quickly from his reel did his mind find ease. The sportsman grasp the line to slow the fish’s frantic run, he then began the task of bring his prize to the boat. Emotions filled his thoughts as he brought the large Mirror carp into his craft and admired it’s natural beauty and girth.

The sun was now sinking fast into the hills, the night sounds soon surrounded him with the familiar eerie tones. Some would think at this point, that his day’s event would soon be over, however upon the flip of a switch his generator fired up and the nightscape became aglow with light. This is bowfishing and the night is still young……….

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Published by archerchick on 08 Jan 2011

Hunting’s Greatest Thrill~ By Fred Bear


BOW & ARROW Magazine’s
BOWHUNTERS ANNUAL
1979

http://www.bowandarrowhunting.com
Hunting’s Greatest Thrill ~ By Fred Bear
Why waste a good part of a a day’s hunt by not hunting?
The deer are there somewhere, waiting to match wits with you.

Hunting from A blind or tree stand may be the
most effective way to get a deer, but it is not the only
way. Getting close to your wild animal on your own, where
the odds are are definitely not in your favor, is by far the most
challenging and satisfying way to hunt.

Frequently the beginning or even intermediate
bowhunter: will mention luck when asked to assess the
reasons for a particularly successful season in the woods.
Such a tendency is common when hunting for whitetail
deer one of the most consistently difficult quarry to take
with the bow. However, luck does enter into a successful
bowhunt only if we conceive of it as opportunity made
available Having been presented with a situation where
deer are present, proper use of the opportunity will depend
upon the hunter’s accumulated skills.

The bow and arrow as a still—hunting arm has many
handicaps outstanding because of their direct correlation
with the opposing instincts of deer. First, and most
important is the short range of the bow, making it
necessary to approach well within the protective screen of
the game’s senses in order to obtain a reasonable shot,
coupled with the considerable motion created in shooting.
Finally, the noise of the bowstring travels faster than the
arrow and affords an alert animal time to get out of its way
if it recognizes danger in the sound.

In still-hunting deer with the bow and arrow these
must be taken into consideration, individually and
in various combinations. The instinctive faculties of the
game and the inherent shortcomings of the bow create a
chain of never-ending problems. The still-hunter must
locate undisturbed deer before his own presence is
detected, penetrating the game’s innate barriers of sight,
scent and hearing, in the effort t0 get within bow range
without being seen, smelled or heard.

For those who haven’t tried it, this whole business often
seems like an impossible feat. Too many firearms hunters
hesitate to try the bow, thinking it too difficult and time
consuming to learn and carry out. Actually this is not so.
With very little initial guidance, the skill of shooting a bow
can be mastered quickly. Except for the short range of the
bow, hunting from blinds or stands is little different from
rifle hunting.

Still-hunting, while certainly more difficult, can be
combined with the waiting game to add interest to those
periods when bedded game makes a stationary position
unfruitful. Many hunters may feel they are too awkward to stalk a
deer, but that, too, is not plausible reasoning. Anyone can
do it simply by slowing down to a super-controlled pace
and concentrating on seeing, rather than just l00king.
There’s a difference.

lf you have done your homework — scouted the hunting
area — you should know approximately where deer bed
down during the midday period, and thus the places most
likely to be productive for still-hunting. Your tactics will be
adapted to the animal’s behavior. Unlike the mule deer, the
whitetail spends much of its time in or on the edge of dense
cover. This is true whether they inhabit our southern
hardwood forests, northeastern cedar swamps, or river
brakes of the midwest.

You’re out there in the first place to take advantage of
the finest season in the woodlands. Why waste a good part
of it by not hunting for half of each day? The deer do not
hide in hollow trees or go down badger burrows. They are
out there somewhere, waiting to match wits with you.
In many areas of whitetail habitat, mast provides a
plentiful and favored fall diet. With the advent of October
winds and rain, acorns will begin to fall. Squirrels
contribute to the bounty by cutting them down. From then
on, some deer can be found feeding on the freshly fallen
nuts at any time of day, bedding right in the open oak
groves between meals if not disturbed. Still-hunting in
stands of oaks can often produce a good chance for a stalk
on deer intent upon filling their stomachs. At noon I once
eased up within thirty feet of a young buck that was busy
feeding.

If not in oak country, or in seasons of poor acorn crop,
the still-hunter should concentrate on covering such areas as
the sunny slopes along ridge tops, heavy jackpines or tree
plantations, poplar thickets, balsam groves and willow or
alder swales bordering streams or ponds. These are the
generally favored midday bedding locations for the
whitetail. Once you have found where the deer are resting,
by moving very slowly and being very alert, you may be
able to slip up on a whitetail. At any rate, it’s fun trying.

When moving through such cover a certain amount of
noise cannot be avoided. This does not, however, make it
impossible to get close to deer. The secret is to move along
slowly, with a pause after every three or four steps. This is
the way a feeding deer moves. While in heavy cover, travel
on deer trails whenever possible. These are not only quieter
going, but lead you to where the animals are.

The direction you approach and move through various
coverts should depend on prevailing air currents. A deer’s
nose furnishes its sharpest sense, and the bowhunter must
keep his scent from the animal. Consequently move either
into or across the breeze direction whenever possible. even
if this means a sizeable detour to get downwind. Some
insurance in areas where the air currents are fickle may be
had from a little deer scent on the boots and clothing.

Soft-finish clothing is also important to the still-hunter,
as is flexible foot gear with soft soles such as crepe rubber
A small occasional noise will not ruin an approach, but a
steady sound pattern will immediately alert the game. And
of course complete camouflage including the face, hands
and bow is certainly helpful.
Patience is really the key to successful still—hunting.lf
you go very slowly and pause frequently, chances are you’ll
do well. But the moment you get anxious and speed up the
pace, something’s likely to go wrong.

When moving, each step will open up new avenues of
vision. Very seldom will you initially see an entire deer.
Look for spots that look like parts of a deer’s body. Train
yourself to spot and examine every bit of unusual color or
outline in the woods. These could turn into part of a
bedded or feeding deer. The important thing to remember
is that you must curb the tendency to see what’s over the
next hill. If you don’t travel slowly you won’t see anything
over the hill except possibly the sight of white tails waving
goodbye. To gain the advantage, you must see the deer
before it suspects your presence, and that advantage can
only come with cautious, slow steps. If hunting correctly,
you’ll spend more time motionless than you will moving.
When you do move. take short steps. By doing so you
remain balanced and can freeze instantly in mid-step when
the occasion demands.
.
I had the privilege of knowing and hunting with the late
Bill Loomis of Newaygo, Michigan. Bill was a skilled
bowhunter and taught me some valuable tricks. One of the
things I learned from him was that in still-hunting, if you
accidently jump a group of deer and they disperse in
different directions, hide yourself near the spot where they
were alerted. Possibly in a half hour or so some deer will
return, hoping to make contact with the others, and you
might have the chance to get off a good shot.

When you are within sight of undisturbed deer, the final
approach or stalk is employed. Have you ever watched the
hands on a clock? You don’t see them move, yet they
change position. I once saw a bobcat stalking a grouse and
it’s progress reminded me of the clock hands. This principle
should govern your close-range stalking, and it can get you
within bowshot of a bedded or feeding deer, even if you are
partially in the open.

Perhaps the greatest deterrent to success during a stalk is
in concentrating on one deer, thereby overlooking others
that are in the area. Deer are seldom alone; You should
constantly be checking for others bedded or feeding
nearby. There is nothing so disconcerting as to be almost
within easy range, only to have an explosive snort from one
side lift your neck hair and send the white flags flying.

Speaking of flags, it is well to remember that a feeding
deer will invariably switch its tail just before raising the
head to look around. Keep an eye on the tail and when it
switches- freeze.

Do nor attempt to stalk a deer from behind a large tree
or dense cover unless you keep its head in view at all times.
If you don‘t you’ll never get away with it, for you are
unable to determine when the animal is looking in your
direction.. I’ve tried this more than once, only to be
frustrated by an eye-to-eye confrontation when, in
preparing to shoot, I leaned out to one side of the cover.

While it is true that, due to eye position, deer have good
peripheral vision, it is still possible to approach an animal
standing broadside, providing its head is down in feeding
position. But again, one must move like the hands on a
clock, watch the tail, and be prepared at every instant to
freeze. Move straight toward such a- deer; it is less likely to
pick up movement than if you progress laterally.

Of the few times you do manage to close within your
range, let’s say thirty-five yards, it does not necessarily
follow that you should shoot immediately. After all, you’ve
put a lot of time and effort into the stalk and one good
shot is worth any number of mediocre chances. What is the
best possible shot? It’s certainly never at a running deer,
nor is it at a deer that’s alert or tense. The best possible
shot is presented by a standing animal, broadside or
quartered away, relaxed, and with its head down.

And what if your slight approach movements are
detected by a deer, unsure of just what it has seen, but
determined to stare at the object in question until it is sure’?
Well, all I can say is that nine times out of ten your
patience will give way before the deer’s. Furthermore, it is
tensed like a compressed spring and ready to explode. Your
best chance then is to slowly ease up. the bow, slowly draw,
and if the animal hasn’t moved before you reach your
anchor, touch it off.
.
Don’t be disappointed though, or even surprised, if the
deer is gone either at the first movement, or before your
arrow gets there. Rare indeed is the deer bagged by a
bowman when the animal was looking at him. But, the
thrill is there and it’s all part of the game.

Occasionally while stalking, a deer will jerk up its head
to stare in your direction, but obviously unsure of whether
it has seen anything unusual. Such an animal will swivel the
ears around and may stomp hesitantly with a forefoot. In
this instance it is best to freeze in an attempt to wait it out.
But beware — don’t make a move when the animal finally
lowers its head, for it will invariably raise it again
immediately, hoping to catch any intruder off—guard. It
may go through this maneuver several times. Hold your
tree-trunk pose until the deer actually starts to feed again
before resuming the stalk.

Although still-hunting can be done by partners who are
used to working with one another, for the most part,
particularly in western-terrain, still—hunting is a loner’s
game. One hunter makes half the noise and movement of
two.

Rainy or extremely damp weather is a favored time for
the still-hunter due to the additional cushioning of noise
and slowing of scent spread by the abnormal moisture
content in the woods. When hunting in damp weather, stick
generally to the lower ground levels. No matter what time
of day, moisture causes the air to settle and would carry a

message of danger to your quarry should you be on higher
ground. If hunting on a day wet enough to require a rain
jacket, wear it under your camouflage jacket. This will
muffle noise otherwise accented by brushing against limbs
or in the act of drawing the bow.

One of the greatest thrills I ever had while hunting
occurred on a drizzly morning after an all—night rain
Although quiet underfoot, the woods were noisy with
water dripping from the leaves. Having spotted a lone doe
busily browsing along and not alert, I managed to close the
distance between us to the length of my bow. The
explosion that came when I tapped her on the rump was
something to see, and made up for all the times I had
similarly jumped in response to an undetected deer’s snort.

The prime period for the still-hunter occurs during the
madness moon. When mating season is under way, for a
period of two or three weeks those desirable bucks are
likely to be encountered any time of the day. Further, they
are less alert than usual and easier to approach, although
this is not to say they are pushovers by any means. During
the rut you do not have to look specifically for a buck
Find the does, keep them in sight, and a buck is bound to
show up. But never underestimate your quarry. The does
never lose their alertness and the bucks, even when preoccupied
with lovemaking, don’t turn into complete
idiots.
A schedule favored by many bowmen is a stand or blind
from first light to l0 a.m., still—hunting until 4 p.m., then
resuming an ambush until dark. But while early morning is
a prime time for occupying a blind or stand, the hour after
dawn is also my favorite time for still-hunting. After
feeding undisturbed all night, deer are much less wary, on
the move toward bedding grounds, feeding slowly as they
go, and keeping their heads down more than at any other
time of day. lf you can find an area where old trails or bush
roads intersect the travel zones between feeding and
bedding grounds, stealing along these at first light may offer
excellent chances.

Just prior to or directly following a storm, any kind of
storm, deer are on the move and therefore provide another
excellent period to hunt through known feeding areas.
There is a time in still—hunting when you must throw
caution to the winds. I have often spotted feeding deer,
observed which way they were headed, then dropped back
out of sight and ran widely around to set up an ambush. In
assuming such a stand, you must be patient. If you have
circled successfully and have found good cover, it often
seems as if they would never get there. You begin to have
doubts, thinking they have probably switched travel
direction. But wait a little longer. As sure as you start to
move, there they will be. Sometimes this ambush works out
and as often it doesn’t, but in this type of hunting a 50-50
chance is a good one.

In late Fall when most of the leaves are down and
tempered by frost, deer make almost as much noise as you
do while walking, especially the bucks who tend to drag
their feet. So do not despair when the under footing is like
cornflakes. Just move as the deer do, very slowly and with
frequent pauses, and concentrate on observing them from a
distance, beyond the range of your sound.

The taking of a deer by this method is especially
satisfying, and rightly so, for you have pitted yourself
against your quarry on its own ground. A successful
still-hunt is the culmination of experience gained during
many attempts. And when at last you’ve made a final stalk
pay off, you’ll know beyond a doubt why this is
bowhunting’s greatest thrill. <—<<<

ARCHIVED BY
www.Archerytalk.com
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Published by bhowardoutdoors on 22 Dec 2010

Why Hunt?

I’ve been given the honor and opportunity to write a blog about something I dearly love and enjoy.  Who could pass up a chance to write a blog on hunting and fishing?  So with the pertinent task of coming up with something so special that it would send the public into a frenzy to read this blog, I began wondering; do I open with a short autobiography?  Well, that would certainly send everyone into frenzy, but not the type the I would like!

How about a few stories of hunting successes this season?   That will surely follow, and at the end of the blog will be a contact address for you to send information and pictures of your trophies. But for the first blog, I’ve decided to explain why we hunt, what we hunt, and why it is important.

Fred Bear, a man known as the father of bowhunting, once said “Don’t base the fun or experience of hunting on whether you get an animal or not.  The kill is way, way down the line.  You can enjoy the woods.  You can enjoy the companionship of the birds, and the fish, and the animals, the color of the leaves…”  It really holds true.  Some of my best experiences have been without the climactic shot to bring down the game.  Every fisherman remembers the ‘one that got away’, but may not be able to tell you anything about the three fish she caught two weeks ago.  The beauty of God’s canvas with you being an integral but non-invasive part of it, that’s really the goal.

As outdoorsmen, our targets are usually the majestic whitetail deer with a crown of bone, or we may hope to bring in the strutting tom eager to meet a new mate.  The trout may be fooled into attacking a cork with feathers believing it to be an unlucky insect.  All have garnered our passions; our unrelenting efforts in pursuit of the biggest and most beautiful of Darwinian challenges.  We have entered nature’s domain, and blended in and became part of nature.  We accepted the challenge and try to conquer nature in its own territory.

 We come up with reasons for hunting and fishing, such as nature tends to overproduce, or disease and famine will destroy more wildlife than hunters if we do not help balance the carrying capacity of the land. But really, what I have found goes back to what Fred Bear stated. I do not have the first dove I killed mounted on the wall. But I do have a fond memory of hunting with my grandfather and my father. I was using an old Ithaca 20 gauge side-by-side that my grandfather and father used as a child. I also have a wonderful memory, and fortunately, a wonderful picture of my son and I walking off a field in Eastern North Carolina with two tundra swan on our shoulders.  My son used the old Ithaca 20 gauge side-by-side that I used as a child.  Hunting is a bridge of generations.  It’s a constant with many variables.   It’s something we must protect, but we must not abuse.  This is why we do what we do and why we enjoy it so.

I look forward to sharing your hunting and fishing experiences, as well as thought provoking and entertaining insights through this blog each week.

 Bill Howard is a Hunter Education and Bowhunter Education Instructor , a Wildlife Representative and BCRS Program Chairman for the North Carolina Bowhunters Association, and an avid outdoorsman.  Please forward any pictures or stories you would like shared to [email protected]

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Published by admin on 10 Dec 2010

TOUCHED BY THE HAND OF GOD by Ted Nugent

TOUCHED BY THE HAND OF GOD
by Ted Nugent

It was January 6, 2006, when 26 year old United States Marine Corp Warrior, Corporal Josh Hoffman, Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 24th Marine Regiment, instinctively improvised, adapted and overcame. With his fellow Marines, he surrounded and captured the terrorists in Fallujah, held them at gunpoint and prepared for the next step in securing the Iraqi village from the hands of evil.
Out of the eerie silence in that God forsaken desert hellhole, a single 7.62x39mm round erupted from a nearby shack, the 139 grain full metal jacketed round slamming straight into the young warrior’s neck, dropping this brave man in his tracks.
Thanks to the Herculean efforts of his fellow Marines, Josh would survive his injury, receive a purple heart, and then head into the toughest journey and challenge of his life. Completely paralyzed, this dedicated sniper and avid outdoorsmen was told he would never run, jump, dance, laugh, smile, talk, shake hands, wave hello, hunt, fish, hike, or fire his beloved rifle ever again. It was all he could do to relearn how to inhale and exhale with the help of a ventilator to struggle through every day from here on out. It was a heartbreaking and graphic example of the tragic price heroes pay for freedom in this insidious war on terror.
How the hell I fit into all this superior human condition I will never know, but clearly God has blessed me with this holy connection that brings me into the lives of these very special human beings. Truly, I am not worthy.
As it turned out, Josh was a big fan of Uncle Ted rock-n-roll and our unapologetic celebration of American freedom and the hunting lifestyle on our Spirit of the Wild TV show. Dear Lord, how lucky can a man get? We were contacted by the Hoffman family when they heard about the incredible Liberator unit created by my hunting BloodBrother Pete Odlund of West Bridge Tooling up in Lowell, Michigan.
This amazing invention consists of a wheelchair friendly platform framed by a rail system that holds a rifle, pistol, shotgun or crossbow, and can be activated and controlled by a joystick or even a small “sip and puff” tube.
Pete and his wonderful family have dedicated themselves to helping charitable causes and handicapped individuals get back into the wild again for many years. His annual Hunt For A Cure Cystic Fibrosis fund raiser is always a record setter, and they are a perfect example of an American hunting family that just gives and gives and gives some more.
When Josh arrived at our little log cabin in the Michigan wilderness, everybody put magnum heart and soul into making him and his family feel welcomed and loved. Because of his terrible injuries, Josh hadn’t been able to speak or express himself in years, but we all saw a smile in his eyes when we explained how he could fire a sniper rifle once again with the help of The Liberator.
We set up some plastic gallon water jugs against the tall bank of our lane, and settled Josh into the unit, instructing him how to sip and puff the .270 into firing position.
As we all know, aim small miss small is tough enough when you can gently manipulate arms, body, head and fingers, but for a guy who literally cannot move, Josh taught everyone in attendance a whole new level of patience and perseverance. It was truly a beautiful thing.
We all wanted to grab the gun frame to zero it in on the distant jug, but knew that Josh wanted to do it himself. He hadn’t done anything on his own in three years, much less pulled the trigger on a sniper rifle.
But we’re talking US Marine Corp here, and Josh kept sipping and puffing till eventually those crosshairs on the small screen were solid, dead center on a jug, and with a final double puff, KABOOOM!
1 plastic Taliban head blown to smithereens, SIR!
I’m here to tell you, there wasn’t a dry eye in the forest that memorable moment as Josh lit up like a kid on Christmas morning, the biggest toothy grin spread across his handsome face and some pretty impressive noises to go along with it. His girlfriend Heather was so moved, she broke down, and I personally had to look away for a moment to compose myself.
Improvise, adapt and overcome. Semper Fidelis. Where there is a will there is a way.
We went on to blast more jugs that day with beautiful Angela Kline showing her amazing marksmanship skills, even though she has severe Cerebral Palsy. We also took a family of great young men on a hunt at the Knowlton’s Laguna Vista Ranch near Pearsal, Texas, with The Liberator where these four brothers, all with various stages of Muscular Dystrophy were able to Liberate a few backstrappers for the campfire.
If you know a special needs person who would feel the soul cleansing powers of the shooting sports, I can assure you The Liberator can make it all come true.
Please visit the two websites, Libertyworx.com and wbtooling.com to make it happen. It’s fun to be around when special people are touched by the hand of God. And by the hand of Pete Odlund, too.

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Published by admin on 24 Nov 2010

THE CELEBRATION OF DEATH by Ted Nugent

THE CELEBRATION OF DEATH
by Ted Nugent

I know, I know, upon reading my inescapably obvious title, the socially challenged amongst us are spitting coffee or other some such beverage and assorted abused brown lippy substances all over their Texas Fish & Game magazine. In a world gone berserk with the scourge of politically correct denial, I expect nothing less.
The good news is that within this fine coterie of rugged outdoorsmen and women in whose hands this fine publication rests, the vast majority of hunters, fishers, trappers and just good ol all American grillmasters know exactly what I am talking about, and in fact grin with the certainty that though totally unnecessary to state in the world of honest consumers, in America 2010 it is time to state the truth as often as possible, confortable or otherwise.
And though I’ve heard it stated over and over again and again ad nauseum ad infinitum, I dismiss out of hand the lame claim that the kill is anticlimactic to the hunt itself. Yeah, right. I see it all the time where sporters get way more excited and jubilant when they don’t bring home fish and game than when they do. No one cherishes and celebrates the entire hunt and hunting lifestyle more than I do, but give me a break. When the beast is dead at our feet due to the incredible dedication, diligence, patience, sacrifice and good old fashioned good luck, the fun factor explodes exponentially when we kill, and we all know it.
The claim otherwise comes from some elitist, out of touch outdoor industry so called leaders, and certain cowardly outdoor writers that are afraid of their own shadows and recoil in abject trembling fear at the assumption that all people outside our sport hate us, hate dead deer and pretend that their store bought dinner is not dead. Not even close.
Of course, known by those of us who actually pay attention to life and hang out with attentive, intelligent and sophisticated folk, we are well away that our very lives carryon due to that very celebration of death. Numerous times each day throughout humankind history, it is the flesh of dead creatures that provide man life itself.
For those of us that hunt, fish and trap, the term “closer to the earth” wasn’t at all necessary to remind us where our protein and nutrition comes from. As we like to say, you can’t grill it till you kill it. Perfection personified.
As we approach our fallen prize, as we turn the straps on the grill, as we take a good hearty snort of prepared meals’ aromas at the table, and as we join hands in reverent thanks to the Creator for the miracle of sustain yield, all the way through the “mmm.. mmm goods”, “yums”, various questionable guttural noises, burps and other assorted such audible sounds of appreciation and joy, clearly genuine celebration ensues for dead stuff everywhere.
I’ve also heard of the feelings of remorse some consumers claim at the death of an animal. I’m not buying it. If ever there was a perfect act and a perfect moment, it is when we balance the herd and bring food home to our loved ones. Remorse? I think not.
So to quote the great Fred Bear, we all surely know that everyday afield does indeed “cleanse the soul”, but of much more importance, done with a sense of excellence and dedication to be the best that we can be, the results will fill our bellies too!
I share a lot of very special meals with my fellow man in my travels around the world, and I have yet to witness anything other than celebration at the table or campfire. Let it be known, the creatures feed, clothe, shelter and medicate us. Always have, always will. That is the prime cause of celebration in life, of life, via death. The beast is dead, long live the beast.

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Published by admin on 03 Nov 2010

Nugent/Palin visit West Virginia

Nugent/Palin visit West Virginia by Frank Addington, jr.

Nugent/Palin visit West Virginia

In support of a candidate that is running for the US Senate from West Virginia for the Republican Party, Ted Nugent and Sarah Palin were in Charleston, West Virginia for the event. With the election just days away, GOP Candidate John Raese hosted the event to get voters excited about his run for Senate. The seat was vacated when the late Robert Byrd passed away earlier this year.

I went to visit Ted and Toby Nugent, although it was a quick trip in and out for them. Security came and got me and took my uncle and I to a van where the Motor City Mad Man was waiting to go on stage. We chatted for a few minutes and then I looked in the back seat and saw Todd and Sarah Palin. I laughed and told Ted, “You’re keeping good company today aren’t you?” and he grinned and replied, “You think?”

I briefly met Todd and Sarah Palin, had a quick photo with her and then they left for the stage. I took a seat and watched as the program got underway. A local band had played some good 1970’s rock and had spirits hight on this beautiful autumn day. Congress woman Shelly Moore Capito spoke, Candidate John Raese spoke, Mr. Raese’s wife introduced Sarah Palin. Former Gov. Palin gave a warm speech and high lighted God, guns, hunting, and the wise use of our natural resources.

Then came the Motor City Madman. I was amazed to again hear Ted’s version of the National Anthem played on his electric guitar. He gave a great speech which contained many “Tedisms”. He also touched on being an asset, God, guns, bowhunting and freedom. He clearly struck a chord with the audience. They responded warmly to his speech and gave him alot of applause.

As the program wound down, the crowd swarmed the stage to meet Sarah, Todd and Ted. I didn’t get to say “Adios” but Toby Nugent texted me awhile later and let me know they found the Hoyt hats I’d left in the van for them. One of his last text’s told me that Sarah had grabbed one of the Hoyt hats. I laughed and I hope to see a photo of her in that hat soon. Watch for it, it was a camo Hoyt hat.

I hope all of you will exercise your civic duty and go vote this November. Although it is the rut in many prime deer hunting locations, many have given their time and lives so that we have the right and ability to vote. So please, November 2, go vote. It’s the least we can do to thank those that have given so much.

Until next time, Adios & God Bless.

Shoot Straight,
Frank Addington, Jr.

www.frankaddingtonjr.com

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Published by admin on 07 Oct 2010

The Aspirinbuster visits Ted Nugent’s Camp for Kids by Frank Addington, jr.

The Aspirinbuster visits Ted Nugent’s Camp for Kids by Frank Addington, jr.

“Hanging out with Theo…”

When Dick Mauch, Bruce Cull, and Ted Nugent want you to do a gig, you do it. I was already coming to Ponca, Nebraska the weekend of September 18, 2010 anyway when Dick asked for my show schedule at Ponca. He was communicating with Bruce and made arrangements for us to leave Ponca in time Saturday afternoon to drive to Yankton, South Dakota for the Ted Nugent Camp for Kids event Ted was hosting that day.

The NFAA headquarters was the location for the event and the Eastons have supported this endeavor with the “Easton Sports Development Foundation Center for Archery Excellence”. Bruce Call and his staff run a first class operation. It’s a beautiful facility that easily handled the huge crowd of young people and their parents. I heard somewhere they had around 450 kids at this event. We got there as the closing ceremonies started and Bruce Cull was on stage. I was told we had a few minutes to set up. We were back stage and I quickly began putting together and tuning my Hoyt Formula RX recurve bow and getting my gear unpacked when I heard, “What’s up Aspirinbuster” and looked up to see my pal Theo standing there. He hugged Dick and Carol Mauch and the I went over to greet Ted. When Ted hugs you you can feel the energy and enthusiasm he has for life and those around him. We visited and then he left to go on stage and give the closing remarks. As usual he gave a teditorial talk and hit on major points about being drug free, living the good life, and hunting and freedom. I saw Greg Easton on the podium and a few other dignitaries.

Bruce had a net already in place so all I had to do was add my Hoyt banner and quickly get some balloons blown up, and find out who they were having toss targets for me. A volunteer stepped forward and we quickly reviewed what would go on. I heard Ted tell the audience something about a “mesmerizing” archery exhibition and I grinned. Only Ted Nugent could give an intro like that. Ted was presented with a custom built gun and then it was time for Bruce Cull to give my show intro. Ted had someone film my shooting and it should be on his show sometime down the road. I ignored the camera and went to work.

It was showtime! The audience gathered around my net and as kids held up cell phones to video and take photos of the show I did what I do. It was a great time and after the baby aspirin shot I invited the audience by a table to get an autographed photo. I ended up signing more than a few hundred photos that evening. Greg Easton had to leave early so I did not get to visit with him.

After the show, we said Adios to Bruce Cull and Ted Nugent and headed to the Black Steer for a fine dinner. Dick and Carol are fine supper companions. Then we made the hour long drive back to Ponca for a party at Tom and Bonnie Ferry’s home. That day I’d did set up the show at Ponca and did two shows, packed the gear and drove an hour or so to Yankton, set up again and did another show, and then packed the gear and drove back. By the time we were at the Ferry’s home, I was exhausted but enjoyed seeing everyone and catching part of the Longhorn’s football game on TV. Dick was still going strong! At his age (83) we should all his health and energy! He and Carol admired Tom’s trophy mounts and shared hunting stories with everyone. It was a fine day.

The Ted Nugent Camp for Kids was a huge success and the NFAA headquarters is a great place! If your travels take you near Yankton, please stop by and see the building. Have Bruce or his staff show you around, there are many vintage photos and other items of interest. It’s a great facility and a real showplace. I think that many youngsters were introduced to the lifetime sport of archery that day by the staff, Ted, Greg Easton and myself! By the way, if your travels do take you to Yankton, try dinner at the Black Steer. Nothing beats Midwestern corn fed beef!

Until Next time, Adios and God Bless.

Shoot Straight,

Frank

www.frankaddingtonjr.com

To learn more about the NFAA, visit: http://www.nfaa-archery.org/

For info on all things Nugent, visit: http://www.tednugent.com/

For more info on Easton, visit: http://www.eastonarchery.com/

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Published by admin on 09 Sep 2010

Deerassic Classic like the Woodstock of Deer Hunting…

Deerassic Classic like the Woodstock of Deer Hunting…

August 6 & 7, 2010 I was in Cambridge, Ohio to attend my first appearance at the National Whitetail Deer Education Foundation’s annual “Deerassic Classic”. This event has it all, from good food to musical entertainment like country singers Daryl Singletary, Andy Griggs, and Rhet Akins. It also features celebrities from tv hunting shows and the hunting industry such as Joella Bates, Ralph and Vicki Cianciarulo, Pat Reeves and Nicole Jones, Chris Brackett, and many more. Oh, then there’s the crowd. More than 15,000 attend the event and many camp and stay the whole weekend.

Just imagine a “Woodstock” for deer hunters you have a pretty accurate photo of what this event is like. There’s good food, lots of exhibits to see, and lots of celebrities to meet. When Jerry Snapp asked me to attend, I felt like we could entertain the folks, even 15,000 of them. The main stage is broadcast on big jumbotrons on the grounds so that people can see the shows on stage. When you stand on the main stage you can see a wave of chairs and people across the grounds. It’s cool.

Jon Petz is the master of ceremonies and keeps the event rolling for the two days. He does the intros, hosts games and skits with audience members, and basically is the face of the event for the weekend. He is excellent at his job. There’s another John, John Page, that is behind the scenes keeping the stage clear, set up, lit and ready for each act and he also does a fine job. This team kept things rolling all weekend. This is a big event with lots of stuff going on and I was impressed that it went so smoothly and without a hitch. Irlene Mandrell is the spokesperson for the event and is also around.

The purpose of the foundation is to educate people about the whitetail deer and also help reconnect today’s youth with the outdoors. They have a facility where the event takes place which is called the Deerassic Park Education Center. Besides the once a year Deerassic Classic, they also host activities such as Ray Howell’s “Kicking Bear One-on-One Archery Shoot and Campout”, a Fall Festival and Trail of Treats, and a new fishing event held in conjunction with a free youth fishing day. It’s good to see that those attending the Deerassic Classic are helping to support events like these that are helping generate an interest in the outdoors for the next generation! This one event generates much of the money that runs programs like these all year long.

There were booths by manufacturers, sales reps, and retailers, as well as tv hunting personalities. This gives attendees the chance to meet these folks face to face and take advantage of it by asking questions, getting autographs and photos.

For my shows I used a young man from the Ten Point crossbow booth named Conner. He threw for me and did a good job, especially given the size crowds the three shows had. I did three mini shows, five to ten minutes each which meant I had to pull the top shots from my exhibition and do those. I did a 12:30, 3:30 and 7:30 show on Saturday. The 7:30 show had the largest crowd of the day— just before the big fifty fifty drawing and just before country singer Daryl Singletary went on stage. The crowd was estimated at more than 15,000 people and all three shows were broadcast on the big jumbotron screens on the grounds. It was awesome seeing a sea of people as far as I could see. John Page had the net ready each time and Jon Petz kept the atmosphere relaxed and fun. I was pretty laid back considering the size of the audience and the time restrictions we had. It was actually a lot of fun.

My shots included two arrows at once, three arrows at once, and even six arrows at once, shooting clothes pins from the net, multiple targets, and the grand finale was shooting three baby aspirin from mid air with three arrows— all behind the back! After one of the shows I held the Hoyt bow up high and Joella Bates snapped a picture from stage left. I laughed when I saw it. I am pretty proud of the Formula RX bow and the way it shoots!

I also took time to tell the audience about being the protege’ of the late Rev. Stacy Groscup, who tossed a Pepsi can into mid air and challenged me to hit it— and that was 25 years ago. It’s hard to believe that 25 years later I stood on stage with 15,000 people looking on. That is the single largest LIVE audience I’ve performed for in one setting. It was cool and I wasn’t one bit nervous. I enjoyed it. Conner did a fine job and we split one of the three baby aspirin and nicked the other two. I’d like to take the time now to thank my bow company Hoyt for the great equipment and their support, all the folks at Deerassic— from the top to the bottom they all worked so very hard to make this event go smoothly. I was asked multiple times each day by more than one person if I was comfortable and needed anything. They are a class act and I enjoyed working with them. Hats off to a great event and great folks. They do so much good for so many I was glad that this event went so well. These folks gave it their all.

After my show I kicked back and relaxed and listened to some good country music and visited with some of the show staff and other entertainers. It was a good time all the way around and I hope to get back there. If you get a chance to attend, I don’t think you’ll be disappointed. Just be ready to show up early and stay late.

That’s the latest. Until next time, Adios and God Bless.

Visit our updated website at www.frankaddingtonjr.com

Shoot Straight,
Frank Addington, Jr.
The Aspirin Buster

Email Frank @ [email protected]

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Published by admin on 24 Aug 2010

Rockin’ the stage at the World Deer Expo

Rockin’ the stage at the World Deer Expo

Birmingham, Alabama

July 16-18, 2010 I was deep in the heart of Dixie for the 27th Annual World Deer Expo at the convention center in downtown Birmingham. Show promoter Bob Coker has hosted this show for almost three decades and his hard work shows by the large number of booths at the event. There were big crowds and lots of excitement in the air for this weekend. If you know Bob you know he’s working on this event year round, visiting other shows, making calls, and planning. It’s a family project and he had his wife and three daughters working too!

On Friday morning Bob and I drove over to the studio for the nationally recognized “Rick and Bubba Radio Show”. We set up the show right outside the studio on the terrace. I did a sit down interview with Rick and Bubba and then we did a few segments outside with my bow. Bob had never thrown for me but did a great job. To end the show I had Bob toss up three baby aspirin and I hit them the very first shot! Rick and Bubba were great and we had a good time during our almost forty minutes on air with them. Their show is #1 locally in the Birmingham market but also can be heard coast to coast on XM radio. Here’s the video clip:

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/8310031

That evening I did a show for the audience and Justin tossed targets for me. I ran into Sam Stowe and Doug Rithmire at the show, they stopped by and watched the show. This audience was modest but we’d have big crowds Saturday and Sunday. I ran into Joella Bates at the show who was there doing seminars, Tim & Shirley Strickland, Eddie Salter and Chris Brackett. I had a booth on the show floor and met some new friends during my time there. The show featured some good seminars and two seminar stages.

I did some shooting for the local Fox Tv affiliate in Birmingham. Getting media attention is always good for a show and I was happy to do some shooting for them.

We had a huge crowd for Saturday’s performance. The upstairs room was packed! The audience was friendly and asked lots of good questions. I asked how many had heard the Rick and Bubba show and hands went up all over the room. Sunday I did my final exhibition and with Andrew tossing targets I hit the three baby aspirin with three arrows the very first shot! My Hoyt Formula RX bow is shooting GREAT. Special thanks to Justin, Andrew and Bob–my target throwers for the weekend.

I left Birmingham knowing why they call it “Sweet Home Alabama” and hoping to get back there soon. You can visit the show website at: http://www.birminghamdeershow.com/

Next Up: Deerassic Classic in Ohio and two appearances in the lone star state in Texas.

Until next time, Adios & God Bless.

Shoot Straight,

Frank

www.frankaddingtonjr.com

PS

Here’s a letter from show promoter Bob Coker I recieved via email after the show:

Hi Frank:

I just wanted to thank you for helping make this years EXPO the BIGGEST show ever. I have been trying to get on the Rick and Bubba show for a long time and finally I had an attraction that they felt worthy to interview on their show. Rick and Bubba are truly an icon in Birmingham and being on their show was a priceless marketing tool. Frank, you truly have a talent, a great message and a tremendous way with the crowd.

Hope to see you soon, your new friend,

Bob Coker

Promoter World Deer EXPO

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Published by admin on 23 Aug 2010

BloodBrothers Or Adversaries-Choices

BloodBrothers Or Adversaries-Choices by Ted Nugent

There is no question that the finest human beings on planet earth are found around hunting campfires worldwide. Kind, hard working, caring, giving, generous, connected, down to earth, clever, sophisticated, educated, loving, funny and genuine are only a few adjectives to describe the families who carry on the most positive environmental, hands-on conservation lifestyle in the world. These are my heart and soul BloodBrothers and they inspire me to no end.

I have been guiding, outfitting, hunting along side and sharing BloodBrother campfires with literally thousands and thousands of these great people for my entire life and I know what I am talking about. The defining example of their greatness continues to sine through when I proudly take part in numerous charity fundraisers for needy children and the hero warriors of the US Military and their families year after year, month after month. Never has there been a time when hunters fail to charge forward, often at great personal sacrifice, to give and give and give some more. In nearly every instance in literally hundreds of instances, my donated hunts have raised record dollars fo every imaginable charity event, and that is because hunters always give more. Know it.

With that glowing truism well established, it is with a heavy heart that we must admit the painful reality that along with the abundant good, there is unfortunately always some bad and ugly. And no where in any segment of society have I witnessed a lower form of life than that which also inhabits our beloved hunting community. Sad but true.

We all know of their ugly existence. The sign shooters, the treestand thieves, the vandals, the drunks, the slobs, the dopers, the meth heads, the poachers, the criminal element, and maybe even worse than all that, the cannibalistic holy-than-thou elitists who stand as buffoonish deterrents to the recruitment of new and more sporting families to our beloved hunting lifestyle.

This inbreeding and cannibalism within our sport is one of life’s truly bizarre mysteries, and the manifestation of the soullessness of mankind.

You know them too. The unsophisticated amongst us who condemn hunting methodology choices other than theirs. The black powder elitists who frown on inline muzzleloaders or those unethical lesser sporters who cheat by using scopes on their front stuffers.

The weirdo’s who scorn the compound bowhunter for his “training wheels”.

The state bowhunting organizations who somehow classify a crossbow as some sort of firearm or possessing firearm capabilities in spite of the universal evidence to the contrary.

The “fair chase” and “no fences” obsessers who condemn private property high fence game managers’ and other hunters’ choices.

The goofballs who condemn the use of bait for herbivores but hunt over various baits themselves, and use bait for bears.

There are hunters who have voted to outlaw hound hunting.

How about the really strange hunters who think wearing camo in public has some negative connotations to the non hunter?

If you can imagine, in the eleven states where Sunday hunting is banned, the loudest voice for such an unimaginable hunting ban comes from hunter organizations. Think about that for a moment. Incredible.

I have personally been attacked forever for my legal hunting choices, choices mind you that are chosen by millions upon millions of great hunters across the land. Many of the world’s greatest and most respected hunters ever, like Fred Bear, Dale Earnhart, Howard Hill, Craig Boddington, Bob Foulkrod, Fred Eichler, Chuck Adams, Cameron Haines, Michael Waddell and millions more enjoy hunting with hounds and over bait. How a fellow hunter can condemn such choices is a clear and present indictment to their embarrassing small mindedness and strange, unfounded elitism. Sad testimony really.

My personal favorites are the clowns who claim I’m not a real hunter and bad for our sport because of my long hair and musical career, then go off with their drinking, smoking, chewing buddies to the topless bar for a night of wholesome recreation. Phenomenal. Meanwhile I will continue to celebrate and promote our honorable hunting heritage in my proven style and to hundreds of millions of people around the world in my unprecedented and irrefutably effective way. I wonder how many of them created a children’s charity to recruit tens of thousands of new sporters. I don’t really wonder. I know.

Bottomline, the animal right’s and anti-hunting goons have never negatively effected our sport anywhere near as bad as our own fellow hunters have. When Michigan produces more than a thousand times the number of mourning doves than we do peasants, but have failed to legalize dove hunting, it is not the anti-hunters who are to blame. It is the bottom feeding hunters who sided with them or failed to stand up for our rights that accomplished this grave injustice, and many, many others across America just like it.

So what can the good guys do? Turn up the heat, that’s what. Engage all hunters to think and try harder to be a positive force for our sport. Initiate the dialog and don’t let the naysayers get away with nonsense and silliness. We can’t educate those entrenched to resist education, but I believe we can galvanize more and more hunters to be supportive of choices and respect the powerful bond of our BloodBrotherhood.

Sometimes you can’t fix stupid, but we can all try harder to maximize the positive and minimize the negative. I for one would never find fault with, much less attempt to ban the choices of my fellow sporters. Waterholes are bait. Foodplots are bait. Mock scrapes are bait. Etc etc etc. We all know that. And every hunter I know supports such choices completely. Let us hope a new wave of upgrade rolls throughout our sport so that someday we can all stand as one to further our beloved lifestyle while uniting to defeat the real braindead enemy of those opposed to us. I have a dream.

Visit tednugent.com of twiter.com/tednugent for more Full Bluntal Nugity

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