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Published by admin on 26 May 2009

Ted Nugent – THE MYSTICAL FLIGHT OF THE ARROW AS HEALER

 

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THE MYSTICAL FLIGHT OF THE ARROW AS HEALER        by Ted Nugent

The young archer’s gaze was intense, animal like, wild eyed. Master athletes refer to this ultra focused intensity as “in the zone”. You can feel it in the eyes and twitching nerve endings of a killer cat in the final stages of its sneak attack, just before the kill pounce. Locked in.

 Macon was there, mind, body, heart, soul and full on spirit as he carefully pulled back the bowstring with all he had, his eyes squinting in the blazing Texas sun, brow furrowing, head slightly cocked, arrow pointing naturally toward the vitals of the 3D deer target ahead. As the arrow nock touched his lip, the bow silently flexed and sent the feathered shaft on its mystical way. 

 Thunk! Dead center into the golden triangle of the deer‘s forward chest, right where the pumpstation and lungs converge for a perfect bowhunter’s kill shot. A broad smile overpowered the sunshine.

 This daily ritual is not all that out of the ordinary at the more than three million bowhunting families target ranges across America, but on this particular day, this was not a normal, everyday arrow or bowhunter. Macon Lynn is just five years old, had never shot a bow before this day, and had just recently endured the ravaging agony of chemo therapy and radiation treatment for his inoperable brain cancer. This may very well have been the most important arrow in the history of archery, for young Macon was in desperate need of escape from the ravages of this life threatening disease, and he and his family figured an escape to Uncle Ted’s SpiritWild Ranch bowhunting epicenter might very well be just what the Dr. ordered. He did.

 Nearly wearing himself out, Macon shot arrow after arrow for most of the afternoon, and we couldn‘t get the bow out of his hands. Archers and bowhunters know why, for we are convinced that our next arrow will be a better arrow, and we never give up trying. We also know what Macon and all the terminally ill kids discover when in that mystical flight of the arrow trance; that there is nothing else beyond our arrow and its next flight. It is that powerfully mesmerizing. Intoxicating. Joyous. Cleansing. Healing.

 Macon joined the Nugent family through the assistance of the wonderful “Wish Upon A Star” charity. A few weeks later, Make A Wish Foundation made the arrangements for seven year old Brianna to visit us at SpiritWild Ranch and other special need kids have been helped by Hunt Of A Lifetime and our own Ted Nugent Kamp for Kids charities. When people really need help, Americans always give it all they got, and we are genuinely moved by the heartfelt love and generosity of so many great American families everytime. We salute them all.

 Over the years, many Americans have been moved to show appreciation for the dedication and sacrifices of the heroes of the United States Military warriors. Those who pay attention, and care, painfully understand that freedom comes with a price, and that the American Dream is fertilized by the blood and guts of warriors who valiantly volunteered to put their lives on the line for the benefit of others. This is the greatest of human virtuousness, and we stand in awe of their service.

 Having saluted way too many flag draped coffins and stood strong with too many grieving families, we created our Freedom’s Angel’s nonprofit charity a few years ago to help the wounded warriors who have given so much. Upon visiting the severely burned heroes at Brookes Army Medical Facility in San Antonio, Texas, we were reminded that most of the military heroes are avid outdoorsmen and women, but with their burned skin slowly healing, there was no way for them to be exposed to the blistering Texas’ sun and were therefore confined indoors.

 Through the undying generosity of many, Freedom’s Angels was able to construct a beautiful outdoor patio where the burn victims could be in their beloved out of doors, but shielded from the rays of the burning sun.

 As a proud and official representative of the Coalition To Salute America’s Heroes (saluteheroes.org) I have been honored and privileged to host many wounded warriors at our SpiritWild Ranch for hunting, fishing, offloading, shooting, archery and BBQ fun. I am convinced that this is the most powerful healing therapy in the world, and we are throttling ahead to do more for them.

 Though the BBQ is great, the machinegun shooting spectacular, and all our outdoor fun remedial, there is no question that the most smiles occur on the 3D archery range. Some of the guys and gals are experienced archers and bowhunters, but many are newcomers. Each and everyone of them light up as arrows are fired downrange and archery form and control is discovered and cultivated.

 With exuberant support across the board, we are now putting together the details of our next Freedom’s Angels project and creating a state of the art archery range for the troops near the Brookes Medical facility so they can shoot more conveniently and develop their archery skills.

 Daniel Vargas, our gung-ho BloodBrother at Saluteheroes.org is working on the details and I wish to thank everyone who so generously helps to make this a reality.

 Never underestimate the healing powers of the mystical flight of the arrow. If you would like to say thank you to the US Military heroes, visit Saluteheroes.org and give what you can. Godbless the US warriors all!

 A big thank you to Saluteheroes.org, Wish Upon A Star, Hunt Of A Lifetime, American Airlines, Avis Rent-A-Car, Hamilton Inns, Academy Sports, Martin Archery, Scott Archery, Sims Vibration Labs, Easton Arrows, Victory Arrows, GoldTip, Delta and McKenzie targets, Mossy Oak, Primos Double Bull blinds, the National Field Archery Association, Freedom’s Angels, ArcheryTalk.com and tednugent.com

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Published by admin on 26 May 2009

Ted Nugent – Luck 13

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LUCKY 13              by Ted Nugent

 

It was hunting day 136 of my 2008-2009 hunting season. That’s 136 days of nonstop hunting, 136 out of 138 days total, but I was as pumped up as I was on day 1, I assure you. I had posted endless yet hopeful ambush vigils in every treestand I have, and had even improvised, adapted and overcome on many a morning and afternoon hunt, killing many a fine beast in Michigan, Texas, New Mexico, Washington, Ontario and California. Stacks of precious backstraps were nestled in orderly fashion in the Nugent freezer barn, but I wasn’t done yet. With the Hunters For The Hungry program needing more sacred protein for my fellow Americans, and the deer herd begging for a much needed balanced harvest, my drive to kill more deer was over the top. And I had the arrows and tags to go with my passion and bloodlust. God made me a hunter. Blame Him.

Hunting constantly not only cleanses the soul, wildly stimulates my inner being and feeds many, but it also tunes me in to the good mother earth where I hunt and live. The shortrange challenges of the bow and arrow demands a much higher level of awareness, and if we pay ultimate attention to our surroundings and dedicate ourselves to be the best reasoning predator we can possibly be, a deep and abiding sense of connection develops in our souls to better understand our resource stewardship duties to our life giving environment. I for one get intense gratification from intimately knowing the terrain, animals and spirit of my hunting grounds. These observations give us the definitive understanding of just how many deer, varmints, and other game needs to be killed to keep the land and critters healthy and thriving. I love that part.

Not only do I video each and every hunt for our Spirit of The Wild TV show on Outdoor Channel, but I have kept a running journal of my hunts forever, detailing the various songbirds, small and big game encounters, with a detailed description of each whitetail deer I get to look over. Coupled with the year round census of our herd by myself, family, land managers, and on our Texas property, game counts by Texas Parks and Wildlife biologists, we have a pretty good handle on just what our deer herd is comprised of and how to manage the annual harvest accordingly. Or so we thought.

Ensconced 18 feet up in a crowsnest of thick leaves, vines and branches, the steady southwest breeze caressing my face, my confidence level was as high as a kite this dark, cool January afternoon. With my video camera solid on a swing arm, I was taping myself this day as the first of what would become a parade of whitetail deer slowly made their way through the forest of live oak trees.

At this point late in the season, my remaining Managed Land Deer Permits included six more does and six more bucks, so I was ready to arrow just about any animal. I had picked out some mature does and at least two management bucks that caught my fancy, when all of a sudden, my eyes bugged out at the sight of a big, mature, multi-tined buck. I examined this deer closely with my Bushnells, and quickly realized that this buck had never been identified before.

I was starting to shake. The handsome old boy had a heavy, tall 7×6 rack with a sagging belly and a thick, swollen neck, and I said a prayer of hope that he would give me shot.

He stayed behind the dense foliage, and then trotted off with his nose hot on a big doe. Par for the course in my hunting life, the big boy appeared to be gone with the wind, so I carefully moved my vidcam into position as a shot on a nice slick six point buck was coming to fruition.

I was literally beginning to draw my 53# Martin Firecat bow when the six point jerked his head up and hustled forward. Taking his place at the edge of the clearing was my lucky 13, and finishing my draw, I sent my 400 grain arrow perfecto right there in the golden triangle where heart meets lungs. With a wild kick and a scramble, the mortally hit beast dashed out of sight, his galloping hooves clamoring audibly on the hard ground, then across the rocky wash, with a final, telltale tumble in the tangle across the dry creekbed. Good grief! I was out of body.

Fumbling like a schoolboy after his first kiss, I quivered as I spun the vidcam arm towards me in a feeble attempt to capture the insanity of the moment. I blurted out a spontaneous burst of pure adrenalin pumped excitement explaining how shocked I was to see, muchless kill such a never before seen trophy buck like this dandy 13 pointer.

Self videoing the thrilling recovery took an explosive turn for the better, for as I found the beautiful deer piled up in a tangle of green briar, I heard the rumble of my wife Shemane’s Mercedes coming down the gravel road above the timbered ridge not far off. With the camera buzzing, I ran wildly toward her screaming for her to come join me in the celebration of this very special buck. I come off like a raving idiot (so what else is new?) but succeeded in getting her attention. She graciously took over camera duties like the pro that she is, and we taped the reverential tribute to this fine 150 class whitetail deer. The TV show of this amazing hunt will be as special as the soul stirring encounter and kill with my lucky 13. I’ll take lucky over good everytime.

To book a hunt with Ted Nugent, visit tednugent.com or call Sunrize Safaris at 800-343-4868.

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Published by Checkmate on 07 Sep 2008

Buying a bow for the first time: A noobie’s insight to selecting the right bow for yourself

Hi,

 

My name is Kyle and I recently became an archery fanatic.  I bought my first bow in December 2007 with full intentions of becoming a fairly skilled archer/bowhunter.  I have not bowhunted in the past and only owned a very old model compound bow when I was around nine years old.  No one in my family or close friends bowhunts or participates in any form of archery.  So I feel that I am fairly qualified to write an article from the perspective of a brand new archer with almost zero knowledge about the sport of archery and no help from trusted family and friends on getting into the sport.  The goals of this post are to help inform new aspiring archers to select the right starting equipment that has the best chance of keeping them interested in the sport with a desire to learn more and become the best archer they can be.  Perhaps this post can help the already seasoned archers by taking a view from a different perspective than one they already hold.

 

Getting Started

 

The first place to start is always with a budget.  There is a WIDE range of archery equipment out there for all different price ranges.  Knowing what you can realistically spend on your gear is going to help you make decisions easier and keep the hurt on your pocketbook to something that is manageable.  One thing that I have learned quite quickly is that archery can get very expensive very quickly.  With proper planning you should be able to minimize the amount of surprises in equipment costs.

My recommendation is that you set a budget for total cost of a ready to shoot package.  Keeping in mind the things that are absolutely necessary versus the nice trinkets and gadgets that fall in the want category.  Things like arrows, an arrow rest, a sight, some form of release either a finger tab or mechanical release, broadheads if you plan on hunting and other accessories that are essential add up to a lot of extra expense.  I would try to find average prices for these pieces of gear and try to match with a bow that will fit the price range you have limited yourself to.  Many pro-shops and outfitter stores will have a good idea of price ranges of entire packages for out the door prices when you talk with them.  These tools are all vital components of the total package, but the remainder of this article will remain focused on selecting the right bow, (keep in mind this article is geared toward compound hunting bows, as that is the only area of archery I have entered so far) perhaps in the future I can spend time on other necessary pieces of equipment.

 

Removing Bias

If you are lucky enough to have friends or family members that already have archery equipment and are willing to help you get started that is great.  I would caution you to be careful of bias in the archery world though.  Many people are very opinionated on archery gear and not very open minded about things.  I think this is one of the biggest downfalls in the archery world.  My recommendation is that you try to keep everything that you have heard in commercials, from friends and family, and from pro-shop techs in perspective.  Although they have very valuable information, be skeptical of hard pressed opinions.  Websites like Archerytalk have a huge wealth of information available at your fingertips; all you have to do is seek it out.  What hasn’t worked for someone in the past that they “will never try again in their life” has more than likely worked flawlessly for countless other people.  Have an open mind when exploring the sport of archery.

 

Research

Archery is a science, and many people have done a lot of work to improve on the equipment that is available.   There are great resources that allow you to get their reviews on gear for free.  I will caution you here however, try to keep in mind that references might not always be playing fair when it comes to reviews.  If a bow manufacturer is a huge sponsor of theirs, you might find biased results.  Archerytalk is a great source of case study and personal experience material.  Archeryevolution.com is a really good source of objective material on hunting compounds.  I would recommend reading up on some of the issues dealt with in their studies and use that information to help guide what you want to look for in a bow.

 

Fling some arrows

The only way to truly decide what bow is best for you is to shoot different kinds of bows.  Head to your local shop and ask for some help on finding a bow in your price range.  Hopefully they will have multiple bows that fall in your price range and you should shoot all of them.  They will be able to give you a release, some arrows and a few instructions on what to do when you start shooting. 

Before you shoot

Have the pro-shop staff determine your draw length.  On many bows today draw length is a set feature and you need different cams to change the draw length of the bow.  Having the right draw length for you is essential, and once you know it you will be able to try out bows that match that length.  Shooting a bow that is either to short or to long is going to be a serious disadvantage for you because it produces bad form while shooting.

Find a comfortable draw weight.  Not everyone is capable of drawing back 70 pounds.  Some people might not even be able to handle 40.  Have the shop staff help you in finding a draw weight that you can comfortably and safely draw back.  Select a bow that is comfortable for you to draw and does not require you to over exert yourself to reach full draw.  Archery is a sport of repetition, if you have trouble drawing a bow five times in a row practice sessions are going to be painful experiences.  On that note, keep in mind that archery muscles are not something used in everyday work.  You will need to build these muscles and potentially have to shoot a lower poundage at first until you have strengthened those muscles enough to pull heavier weight.

Now lets get to testing the bow.  The things to evaluate from bow to bow are:

 

Draw Cycle:

This is how the bow pulls for you and how much effort is required to reach full draw.  Each person can be different and a harsh draw cycle to one person might feel like very smooth to another.  It is important to keep things equal between the bows you are testing.  Make sure they are all set at the same draw weight.  Pulling 70 pounds on one bow and then 50 on another is obviously not a fair comparison.  If they do not have the appropriate limbs to match draw weights on the bows make sure to keep that in mind when you evaluate each. 

 

Hand Shock

This is essentially how much recoil is in the bow after the shot is taken.  If you have ever took a swing at a solid object with a metal baseball bat and the resulting vibration made you drop the bat in pain you have an idea what hand shock feels like.  Of course it is not that extreme in any bow on the market today (at least to my knowledge).  However, like a harsh draw cycle, an abundance of hand shock can make practice sessions with a bow displeasureable.  Try to look for a bow that does not vibrate much when you shoot.  Note that it is probably impossible to eliminate all hand shock from any bow, but you should be able to find something that does not feel like a baseball bat hitting concrete in your hand.

 

Looks

Some people might disagree with me here, but I think it is important to have a bow that you like the looks of.  Many people are generally proud of their bow and like to show it off.  It is similar to having a car or home you are proud of.  Remember to keep this in perspective though as well.  Looks are not nearly as important as functionality.  However, all things being equal between two different bows go with the one you like the looks of better.

 

End Results

If you are consistently shooting great groups with one bow and they fall apart with another, go for consistency.  It might be your form, or torque on the bow that is making you shoot worse, but it could be something that just doesn’t work for you.  Perhaps the grip is different and you can’t hold one bow without torquing at the shot, whereas you can hold the other steady and straight.  Just remember that one bow needs to be consistently different from the other.  Don’t just shoot one group with each and choose the one that has the better group.  Also, don’t think that because one group is closer to the bullseye than the other it is automatically better.  Once again, sighting the bow for yourself will produce better accuracy than when you are just testing the bow.

 

Workmanship

Inspect the bow for manufacturing defects and flaws.  You are paying for a piece of equipment that should be free of them.  Look at the machining on the different parts of the bow.  Check for defects that could affect a bows performance and also affect the look of the bow.  You wouldn’t buy a new car with a big scratch in the paint, you shouldn’t buy a bow with one either.  Also make sure the replaceable parts on the bow are in good shape.  Check to make sure the string is not frayed and looks like it is in good condition.  Some of the bows in shops get used quite a bit before they are sold.  Make sure you have a good string on the bow that is going to last instead of needing to replace it not long after you have bought it.  If you are unsure about the quality of the string you are getting ask the shop to replace it before you buy the bow.

 

Things NOT to worry about

Don’t worry if you can’t hit the bullseye with a bow the shop is letting you try out.  To get accurate you will need to have the bow set up for you and sighted in to your anchor point.  Most shops are going to let you shoot the bow to get a feel for it, I think it would be a rare occasion to have them sight the bow in before you have even bought it.

Brand names.  Just because a bow shop is a Hoyt, Mathews, PSE, Bowtech or other dealer, does not mean that those are the right bow for you.  Most people could be happy shooting a bow from just about any company out there.  Try to remember the points I made about bias.  It comes from all angles in the archery world, so remember to be cautious.

Equipment that is already on the bow is something you shouldn’t put to much stock in either.  If you don’t like a piece that you are trying out such as the rest or the release, remember you don’t have to buy those pieces.  You can dress your bow with whatever you want on it later.

 

Final Thought

 

Ultimately you are looking for a bow that you are going to enjoy shooting.  Try to recognize what makes shooting one bow better than shooting another bow FOR YOU, whatever that characteristic(s) is(are).  Be informed and take your time making this decision, it can be a difficult task to find the right bow, especially the first time.  As with anything else, experience will guide and direct you on what qualities you like in a bow, but hopefully this article will help you make a more informed decision on your first.  If this isn’t your first time buying a bow, hopefully this article will help you refine your decision making process or perhaps encourage you to try something new and compare results.  Either way, I wish you the best of luck and take care.

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Published by Kelly Johnson on 07 Apr 2008

Venison 101. An overview for beginners

Hey ya’ll. I’ve been cooking professionally for over 20 years now and thought I’d pass along some tips that may help get the most enjoyment after you tag the big one

First we’ll talk about Venison.

Vension is lean. Made even leaner by the fact that the fat is not pleasurable at all because it coagulates at a much lower temp than farm raised animals.
What that means is if you add venison fat to a sausage recipe when you eat it and take a drink….it turns to vaseline in your mouth. So….trim all the fat off. We can add a more palatable fat later.

There are 2 major factors in how your animal will taste inherently.
1. Diet.
A Whitetail from the Rocky Mountians that lives in big woods will have a very different flavor profile than one from the agro region in Illinois for example.

2. Processing.
How the animal was killed and handled during butchering. I’ll do butchering later if there’s interest so for now let’s just say gut it, skin it and cool it as quickly as possible

Next let’s break these up into 2 parts.
Texture. How tough, tender, stringy etc…physical traits in mouth feel, “bite” and texture
And
Flavor. Gaminess, piney or sagey-ness etc

Texture.
The “whys”

The older the animal and/or rougher the terrain the tougher it’ll be.

The harder the muscle works, the tougher the meat will be.

The leaner the diet, the tougher it will be. The more protien rich, the more tender.

The “Fresher” the tougher. Letting an animal hang or age properly goes a long way in tenderizing it through natural enzymes breaking down the tough connective tissue. I recommend 7-14 days for a whole carcass depending on age and size at around 41 degrees.

The thinner, the more tender. The thicker the tougher. Thin slices off a roast or raw meat sliced and pounded thin (like scallopine) before cooking will always work.

The “Hows”
Roasts.

1.Don’t Boil it. Don’t boil it…don’t boil it!
Boiling meat is a great way to waste time and ruin meat. SIMMER! Tiny bubbles! Simmer has the heat without the agitation. Bring it to a boil and QUICKLY lower the heat to low simmer. As low as you can get it and still get a bubble every 2-3 seconds. Cover it and cook till tender…1.5-4 hrs depending on size.

2.Use liquid….wine, stock, broth, water, beer etc. Not submerged in it but a couple inches in the bottom will help keep it moist and cook evenly.

3. Add fat.Drape raw bacon over the top before you put the lid on, rub a little butter on top the last 2-3 minutes of cooking etc. This will all but gaurantee it be moist and not dry out.

Thinner cuts and steaks

1. Don’t overcook it. Medium rare to medium will be most tender.

2. Don’t boil it! If you start with thin slices for salisbury steak or something when you add the stock or gravy…simmer.

3. Pound it or jaccard it. (Search Jaccard…great tool for the wild game chef and well worth the $ IMO) Pounding with a meat mallet or jaccarding breaks down the connective tissue by force.

4. Marinate it. I’m not a big fan of marination in general but it does help a little. Acid is the tenderizer…(it’s the vinegar in italian dressing )

Flavor

The coppery, bloody, “gamey” flavor can be offset by a myriad of ingredients.
Acids and sugars mask it well but you may need to add a fat to offset the acid….which works out well becasue it’s generally so lean the fat will help with mouth feel and “roundness” anyway.

Examples of acidic ingredients are…
Vinegars (Balsamic is great or apple cider maybe)
Wine
Beer
Fruits. Currants, blueberries, cranberries, cherries, raisins etc.

If you want to test this take your standard venison tenderloin and cook half in a hot pan with whatever gravy you use or sauce you make. Now add 1/2 Tbsp of red wine vinegar to your sauce and taste it again. You’ll see what I mean.

Now the straight vinegar goes a long way. Just a touch in the sauce. If you add too much a little sugar will help even it out and add a litt ebutter or oil to smooth it over. I’ll often mix Cider Vin and Sugar and cook till it’s a syrup and keep that around the kitchen in a small bottle to add as I need it.

Now unless you like sweet and sour everything you may need to smooth some of them out with a little fat. Add a little pat of butter to the sauce at the end maybe or a drizzle of GOOD olive oil where it fits will round these out and bring the flavors to the meat instead of having the meat overpower everything else.

Here’s the theories at work
Venison loin with Chocolate Balsamic, Baby root vegetables and Horseradish sprouts.
Venison Loin

Well that’s all pretty generic stuff and I hope it gives a little insight and maybe help someone enjoy their kill a little bit more.

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